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Full text of "The Tower, 1929"

The 

1929 

TOWER 




I5T0UT 



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D. W. Marris 
Cbitot 

O. :\. JJaclotti 

3u»ine« Hunaacr 






BERi 



Obe 1929 
Oower 



"A record of stuovnt activitv 
anb campus life 

publication cf the 
Senior Class 

of 
Zd\)q. Stout institute 

Sttcnomenic. Wisconsin 



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*forewor6 

3n working out an art 
theme for tl)is book we have 
cnoeavoreo to select subject 
matter which woulo be truly 
representative of ohe Stout 
institute as being a dis- 
tinctive type of school, oh* 
illustrations have been 
chosen to represent lines 
of work which are incluoeo 
in the school curriculum. 



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(Tontents 
^5be (Toiler 

Scenery 
faculty 
Classes 

(Tollecje Tife 

Organizations 

AtyUttc* 

Tiatur&s 

obe Sunny Side 
Sttenemcnie 






-Alma Mtater 

On the banks of "Cake 
3ttenomin, * Stands 
our IMma 5ttater true, * 
^#ith tower high ano bril- 
liant "S"; v 3^or h«r 
we'll dare an6 60. * 
she'll sing her praises 
many, * ^c'll glorify her 
name, v Anb on through- 
out the years of time, * Our 
love for Stout proclaim. 




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i)e6ication 

ot)e noteworthy achieve- 
ments of men ano women in 
the fielos of 3noustrial l\rts 
an6 Momc Economics ^rouca- 
tion merit our serious atten- 
tion. Our ZMma Sttatcr has 
oeemed it fitting to confer hc«* 
highest honors upon these 
leaoers. oo them, in recog- 
nition of their splenoic work, 
we are proud to fceoicate this, 

Ob* 1929 Cower 





m 




Dr. Charles Allen Promir, 

Director 
William Hood Dunwoody Industrial Insti- 
tute. Minneapolis, Minnesota. 



Dr. Robirt Lawri xct COOl i v. 

Director 

Milwaukee Vocational School, 

Milwaukee. Wisconsin. 







§§ 



Dr. i i >* is a i n ki Wilson, 
Auittant Commissioner of Vocational and 

Extl lU/OM / ■!■■•< at ion 
University of New York. Albany, N. Y. 




Dr. John Cai.vin Wkx.mi. 

Director 

Federal Board for Vocational Education, 

Washington, D. C. 



Pate t 



IV 





Dr. Charles Rickltson Allen, 

i "militant 
Federal Board for Vocational Education, 
Washington, I). < . 







Dr. Gerald DbForrest Whitney, 

Director 

Department of Vocational Education, 

University of Pittsburgh, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 







Dr. Nicholas Ricciardi. 

Division of Vocational Education 
State Department of Education, 

Sacramento. California. 



m 




Dr. Aimiaidi Steele Baylor, 

Home Economics Education Service, 

Federal Board for Vocational Education, 

Washington, D. C. 



29 




Chari.es Allen Prossi-k 
i if collegiate honors lie has enough. His Bache- 
lor's and Master*! degrees, his l*h. D., his L. 1-. 
B.. his L. I- I*-. from five great colleges left 
little for Stout to do toward adding honor ?o 
honors already bestowed. Yet because of his 
keen interest in the field of education for whieii 
StiM.it stands and because of his dominating posi- 
tion in that Field it was particularly fitting that 
The Stout Infinite should in 1925 confer upon 
Charles Allen I'rosscr the degree of Doctor of 
Science in Industrial Education. 



S^tibiS?® 



C-HARLJS RlCKETSON ALLl N 

Ifodesty and ability walk well together in the 
person of Charles Kicketson Alien. Courtesy and 
tact are outstanding qualities in his personal at 
tributes. His tireless amplication to any job 
added to those qualities just enumerated consti- 
tute the factors that have made him an outstand- 
ing chaarctcr in the held "f vocational education. 
His educational and cx|>ericuce record CU '" 
read anywhere. This space is better used to pay 
tribute to the man who has many times paid for 
any encomiums we may now accord to him. The 
Stout Institute conferred the Doctor of Science 
degree upon him in 1927. 



<g^£>£73 



ROBtRT Lawifnce Cooley 

Probably no man in recent years in any divi- 
sion or department of education because of actual 
accomplishment has become so widely known 
throughout America as has Kobert I.awrencc 
Cooley. He not only pioneered in part-time voca- 
tional education in this country but he has year 
after year maintained the had in his chosen field 
Of education. He has within a few years taken 
his place as the chief ex lonent of compulsory 
part-time education and lias stood its able de- 
fender. The degree of Doctor of Science in In 
dustrial Education was conferred upon him by 
The Stout Institute in 1925. 



Gerald DiForrest Whitney 

Having taken both undergraduate and graduate 
work at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, 

Gerald DeForreat Whitney began nil educational 

career along lines similar to those which have 
made Stout nationally known. That preparation 
supplemented by further work taken at the Uni- 
versity of Pftttburg and at Columbia made possi- 
ble his well known accomplishments in teaching 
ind supervisory experience. His keen mind and 
his determined ambition, in addition |o his record 
of accomplishments, well justified the honor confer- 
red upon him by this institution in 1927 when he 
was granted the degree of Doctor of Science in 
Industrial Education. 



(S^<&)i£73> 



&&£>&'& 



John Calvin W'kh.iii 
Under the leadership of John Calvin Wright. 
Director of the Federal Hoard for Vocational Edit, 
cation, the new movement for vocational educa- 
tion has gone steadily forward year by year. He 
has influenced legislation, both state and national, 
has ironed out difficulties in various states, and 
made his own department into a harmoniuiis and 
influential organization headed toward still greater 
accomplishments. The St.mt Institute honored 
itself when it honored J. C. Wright by conferring 
upon him in 1926 the degree of Doctor of Science 
in Industrial Education. 



Adflaidl Steele Baylor 
The Stout Institute has been interested in Home 
Economics, Domestic Science, and Homeinakiny 
for many years. Miss Adelaide Steele I'.aylor li;i - 
for several years devoted her masterful abilities 
to this same field of educational opportunity. A- 
teachcr, supervisor, lecturer, author, she has done 
much to advance the cause of Home Economics. 
Iler work in many localities has been far reach- 
ing, Sbe bai become an outstanding exponent of 

the best and most practical in education of the 
women in America. St-nt conferred upon her the 
degree of Doctor of Science in Home Economics 
in 1928. 



<S^£)i£?2> 



©^L<£)j-2^ 



Lawil Albert Wilsox 

Lewii Alliert Wilson is still a young man. 
During recent years he has done much to make 
secure the place of vocational and industrial edu- 
cation, but uli.it In- has done is of small conse- 
quencC compared to what be will do in the years 
before him. Dr. Wilson is able, ingenious, and 
fearless. He has established himself in the con- 
fidence of those with whom he i> associated. He 
is now better prepared to do significant things 
than before. Stout in 1926 showed its Bpfi) 
tlon by conferring upon him the degree of Doctor 
of Science in Industrial Education. 



Nicholas Ricciardi 

Nicholas Ricciardi earned both his Bachelor's 
and his Master's degrees in the University of Cal 
ifornia. His experience in teaching and his posi- 
tion a» supervisor gave him still further prepara- 
tion for the work which earned for bini an en- 
viable reputation. It is possible, however, that his 
earlier and varied experience in industry had as 
much to do with his later success as did his col- 
lege training. As a lecturer and author he is 
widely known, particularly among those interested 
Id industrial and vocational education. He was 
given his degree of Doctor of Science in Indus- 
trial Education in 1928. 



119291 



Page io 



X3l?e 

(Tollege 

Scenery 
~f acuity 
Classes 




industry 



Xo matter how loudly uc may scoff at failure, we are always justified in for- 
gjffog the man who tries. Industry does not always result in notable attainment; 
however, it is certain that success is always the result of more than a mediocre effort. 






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cience 



We weigh, we analyze, we measure, we shape; — end what is the result? — 
knowledge and experience. If it lies ui/hin human power la control the reins of 
destiny, certainly the parent and the teacher take turns at the driving. 



MRS. CORDELIA WILLIAMS KI NT 

1887-1928 

Walking through trees to cool my heat and r 
1 know that she is with mc here again. 
All that is simple, happy, strong, she is. 
Caressingly I stroke 
Rough bark of the friendly oak. 
\ brook goes babbling by: the voice is hers. 
Turf burns with pleasant smoke; 
1 laugh at the birds and th< 
All that is simple, happy, strong, she is. 

, r the whole wood in a little whde 
Breaks her slow smile. 

— Adapt Grates. 



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Pri shunt Rlkton L Nt-LSOS 



The Professionalizine of 
Teaching 

Any college administration is gratified when 
there is evident on the part of the student group 
a spirit of loyalty and good will toward the in- 
stitution. That attitude of mind is largely due 
to college associations and experiences. But the 
background, the history of the school, has its 
influence too; and to that I desire at this time 
to direct the thought not only of the class of 
1929, to whom we are saying adieu, but to those 
who remain with us during the next two or three 
years. 

Menomonic was the first city in the United 
States in which organized and systematic instruc- 
tion was provided in all grades of public schools 
through the high school. The Stout Institute A 

"..is the first teachers college to restrict its ac- 
tivities to the training of teachers of home eco- 
nomics and industrial education. In this respect 
it has made a definite contribution toward ele- 
vating the work of the teacher to the level of a 
profession. 

The making of the business of leaching into a 
profession has been a long, tedious struggle and we are still far from the desired goal. 
When we refer to the profession of teaching we are by inference misrepresenting the 
fact. Law, medicine, and the ministry are recognized as professions. No matter how 
poor the lawyer may be or how unsuccessful the doctor may be he belongs to a pro- 
fession. 

There are many reasons why teaching has not yet attained the high rank to which 
it is entitled. Lawyers are trained in schools of law. ministers are educated in divinity 
schools, and doctors in medical schools. From four to seven years of serious application 
to study of the field in which they are expected to work is required of them. In every 
quarter of every year thru that long period emphasis is placed upon the one line of 
study and research with which the candidate began. 

That is not true with teaching. Thru all these years teachers have been trained 
anywhere and everywhere. Today the situation is not much improved. Teachers still 
come from high schools and colleges of letters and science where much attention is given 
to languages and literature and very little to the child or the science of educating 
him. In these colleges the preparation of teachers is incidental. The only hope for 
better things lies with the teachers colleges which have declared their independence ot 
the old-time university standards. Even those colleges will not do much toward the 
establishment of a profession until they, too, begin to specialize and prepare teachers 
for particular fields. 

Teaching will not generally be referred to as a profession until the teachers col- 
leges arc recognized as the proper agencies for training teachers; nor until these colleges 
offer more specialized courses and experiences to particular groups of students preparing 
for specific departments in the teaching field. The Stout Institute stands as a pioneer 
in this field of specialization. When other teachers colleges follow the lead of the Stout 
Institute, and not till then, will teaching be dignified by universal recognition as a 
profession. 



/ y 






^ 






Clyde A. Bowm in 

Dean. School of Industrial Education 



Rctii Mi< MM I s 

Dean, School of Home Economic! 



Hilda Bam ruo 
Physical Training 



Clara Boughton 

Home Economics Education 



Walter B. Davison 

Social Sciences 



Arthur G. Brown 
Lducation 



Lovni Buchanan 

Foods 



Lillian Carson 
Related Art 



GtRTRUOF i Ml MI\N 

English Literature 



M. Winnona Cruise 
Nutrition 




192 



Page ti 



*p 




Hatty Dahlbi rc 



Fri i> L. Curran 

I ice Teaching Supervision, 
Education 



Danii i Gri i v 

Drawing 



GRACI M. Do* 

Director of Dormitories 



Mabel Dt 

Clothing 



>V 



John i 

Social Sciences », 



•5. 






2 



r 



M Hanson 

NX 'oodwork 



1 u Ian Bakes 
Public Speaking 



C W. Hague 

Printing 



H 



■ — 




echanics, 
Work 



ZI929i 



Page .».• 



' 



! ii : i\n Jets* 
Clothing 



Thos. V. John- 
Woodwork. Sheet Metal 



Mary M. M< < \: MOM I 

Chemistry 



Frfda Bach 
Biological Sciences 



Rw F. KftANZUfCH 

Home Mechanic*. Electrical 



M Mil i I I 



MEKNA Mti I IK 
Biological Sciences 



Ki ITH 
Metal Work 



\ITH STRAYER 

Home Administration 



Mary I. McFaddin 
Education 



1929 




Pate JJ 






/ 




191 



M w Vak Pinrn n 

Social Science* 



H. C. Mil NEI 
Metal Work 



I)i : : \ PAYNI 

Institutional Administration 



Paul C. Nllsox 
Woodwork. Drawing 



S. E. Pavlus 
English. Athletics 



Mw.ii Mtrn 
Related Art 



I'rici 
Home Economics Education 



s 

English Com; 



Flora Snowdi n 
Clothing 



F. E. Tustison 
Applied Sciences 









Page 14 



*\s 









I \ Vasolo 
Prc-Pa rental Education 



Home Economics Education 



Cuuu M. Vanci n 
Nunc 



Robirt L. Which 
Vocational Education 



B. M. Punk 

Business Manager 



N M. Frocgati 
Librarian 



Mivs Irish 
Executive Secretary 



R. B. Antrim 
Assistant Librarian 



Gertrude O'Briix 
Rcgistrar 



Stenographer 










191 



Pate «J 




: son 

Stenographer 



Clara J. Yah* 
Stenographer 







1)929 



\ 



Page s6 








.Acaiemic 



/« //.»<• sbadou of tln-ir books we may see the light of accomplishment, a light 
which illuminates the past and foretell" the SUCCeSt of the future. 




W. Jeski 



L. Hacirii 



H. Brakir 



R. WlKMK 



Scholarship Awards for 1928 



At Commencement time the Eichil- 
bcrgcr Scholarships were awarded to two 
men and two women of Senior rank upon 
the basis of scholarship, personality, fu- 
ture possibilities, social attitude, and value 
to the school. Henrietta Brakcr, Lucilc 
Hagcrty. Ray Werner, and Walter Jeske 
each received the award of one hundred 
dollars. 



Two Sophomores and two Freshmen 
were given honors for the highest rank in 
scholarship in their respective classes. 
Those who were honored were Elizabeth 
Williams and Douglas Harris of the Soph- 
omore class and Eleanor Ovcrby and Er- 
nest Christcnscn of the Freshmen class. 
This is the first time that this recogni- 
tion has been given at the Commence- 
ment Exercises. 




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1929 



Page f6 





entors 




»**»- 



— 



Seniors 

OUR parting wish to our Alma Mater is: "Strive ever for a Bigger and Better 
Stput." The contacts of the past four years have, in general, been very agree- 
able and profitable to each of us. It is true that wc are leaving this campus, 
but we are not through with The Stout Institute; our future performance will 
reflect good or bad upon the reputation of this school, even as our work as students 
has left its mark. 

Wc do not pretend to have built colossal monuments during our four year sojourn, 
but it is our honest hope that we have creditably supported this school in its activities, 
and that ws have been participants in its most noble aspirations. 

It is with deep feeling that we look back upon our years at The Stout Institute. 
Whatever regrets we may have wc attribute to our own shortcomings; however, regrets 
are the product of unconcern and are about to be replaced by our determination to 
co-operate in spreading the tame of this institution throughout the forty-eight States. 
Stout, we will answer when you call. 



( ! ASS OFFICERS 



Clifford Petersen 

Clari NC I Bl IK 



Emma Soggi 
Lillian Hylland 

VlRDI N K.\MM 

Helen Sti rzi r 



: 



- Presidents 

Vice-President 
Secretary 

Treasurers 




1929 



/'<!£<• P 



Sam Andlkmjn ... Hudson, Wisconsin 

A pleasant, friendly sort o' way 

lit has. Iff he at work or at play. 
Glee Club, Rifle Club. 



Ll'1-.lla Anderson 



Deer Park, Wisconsin 



"i.,r 



For ii hat I will, I will, ami theft jii end. 

V. V. C. A. President, Inky Fingers. 



Henrietta Brake* - - Menomonte, Wisconsin 
"Hank" 
ji j j tcbolar, and a ripe good one. 
S. S. A. Vice-President, M, A, P., S. M, A., Advisor) 
Board. 

Donald Cole - EvtnsviHe, Wisconsin 

"Don" 
'Til nut in niortali to command lUCCetf, ue'll itttTVt it. 



Clarence Belk ... Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 

A man he wtrm of cheerful yesterdays and confident 

tomorrows. 

Senior Class President, Manager of Athletics. 

Elizabeth Di<t-*r - - Louisville, Minnesota 

"Hope" 
Happy -no-lucky, I am free; 
Nothing there a that bothers me. 



[sun i I K\!\\ - Bessemer, Michigan 

Let tnch teach OthtTi u ho themseliei excel. 
Areme. 

Burl Banks .... Chetek, Wisconsin 

Let the world go as it may; 
I'll take it any way. 
S. T. S. 




i 19291 






■^ 







Fri i> Die kir - - - Menomonie, Wisconsin 

"Deck" 
He uas a mju, take him for ail in all; 
I shall no* look upon his like a^dhi. 
Football. Basket-ball, Advisory Board. 

Ruby Human - Bessemer, Michigan 

She hat a natural, wise sincerity. 
Philumathean, Arenic. 



hsmiK GkfiNSOl - - Monticello, Wisconsin 

IFetf timed tilence hath more dotpunci then fpeeeb. 

i ly|>cri.oi. 

Oriiy Duffjn - * - Whitewater, Wisconsin 

"Duff" 
A mitt J cultured an J callable of Utter thought. 
Football. Athletic Council, Trowel. 



|, M | | Curry - Marshall, Minnesota 

"Curry" 

Wc wiill not hut i- him othtrwue. 

U, mi Hu.iKiy ... - Knapp, Minnesota 
"Ink," 
A whining w*y* " pleasant mile, 
A kinjly uord for all. 
S. M. A., Manual Arts Players. 



Virs IIuv/imr • Wausau, Wisconsin 

Conn-, give u\ a teste of your tpteJUy. 



F.D. DOBl.FR 



Great Falls, Montana 



r Bd" 



A tuari'i a mail ulfereier you puJ him. 






11929 



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I.n.iiAN Hvlland • - Mcneimonie, Wisconsin 

Music is the uniienal language of mankind. 
Glee Club, Senior Class Secretary, Tower f M. A. P., 
Hvpcrian. 



Harry Frinoer - - Cambridge, Wisconsin 

He can laugh with the jolliesi end gmtwork the best. 
Rifle Club. 



Carl CImoii - - - Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 

"Cully" 
A moral, sensible, and welt-bred man. 
Glee Club. S. T. S. 



Oi in ri, Kai.iv - - - Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 

Active doer, strong, to labor, sure to conquer. 



Pearl Lindall St. Paul, Minnesota 

Worth, courage, honor; these indeed 
Your su\trnam c and birthright ere. 
Associate Editor of Tower, Hyerian, W. A. A. 

Jeahsttz Jackson - - Bniturd, Minnesota 

In her very quietness there h charm. 
Philomathcart, Advisory Board, 



Douglas Harris - Tomah, Wisconsin 

No matter now uhat others may say. 
We call him Kocomrj. 
Editor-in-chief of Tower. S. T. S., Football. 



fcviRiTT Harris ... hlmumid, Wisconsin 

I'm hay ear. 
Y. M. C. A. President, S. T. S. 










119291 






*v 




GliOKGE Kirn - Tomah, Wisconsin 

A merry heart makrtb a cheerful countenance. 
football. 



Orpha Stevens Lund - - Baltimore, Maryland 
So with decorum all thru,;, carried; 
Af/u frouncd, jii J {ihrsbeJ, and then wtt married. 
Scoutonia. 



MILDRED Olson - Baldwin, Wisconsin 

"lofty 

She makes simplicity i fftce, 
Gl« Club. 



William Kkvccbx 



"Bill" 



Rib Lake, Wisconsin 



A man of cheerful yesterdays and confident tomorrows. 
Gym Team, Rifle Club. 

Virnii v KaMM • - Livingston, Wisconsin 

Be thine nun self eier and than art admirable. 
Stoutnnia, S, T. S. 

Ethel Patrick ... Whitewater, Wisconsin 

BiiiU on and make thy castles high and fair, 
Riting and reaching upward to the skies. 
Science Club, Hypcrian, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

I uiARii Maki - Cloquet, Minnesota 

Yn, Ire'i teen hut teldotit heard. 
Rifle Club. 



[OMN Lakso ... Gilbert, Minnesota 

Drudgery and knowledge are of a kind. 
Stoutonia. 



Page 34 



19291 



HELEN Roth ... Chisholm, Minnesota 

"CbUsf 
She tb*l um .tri fair and never !>rouil, 

Had tongue at will, end yei u u never loud. 
Flypcrijn President. 

SnriiiN OeLLEMCH - - - Racine, Wisconsin 

"sin ,••• 

/Mm.' foddi I would ,.-. everything 
To tee a dear friend's face. 
Tower, Glee Club. M. A. P. 

John- N'otebaart - - North St. Paul, Minnesota 

A merrier matt, 

I net rr ipent an hour*! talk wit hat. 
Football, Basket-ball, Athletic Council. 

EMMA Socge - - - Two Rivers, Wisconsin 

"Soggie" 

T/miii bait no :orrou :n fh\ long. 

No n intei :u toy year. 

Senior Class Vice-President, Glee Club, M. A, P.. 

S. M. A. 

CLIFFORD Pi I'lRJON - - tonic, Wisconsin 

"Cliff" 

I know thee for a man of msny thought*. 

Phillip Olson - Chisholm. Minnesota 

"Phil" 
i way Jo lomtthing sentntionsi 
Band. Metallurgy, Glee Club. 

Helen Stetzer .... Sparta. Wisconsin 

"fitlle" 

Careful, courteous, competent. 

Philomithcan. 

Martin Opem ... Zu:nbrota, Minnesota 

"Marty" 

A j"l I y good fellow. 

Football, Basket-ball. 




11929 



Pan U 



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Jay Prtfst - Saint James, Minnesota 

T/jo' modest, on his unembarrassed brow 
Nature had written — Gentleman. 
S. T. S.. Baskec-balL 

Lydia Stinut - - . Menomonie, Wisconsin 

•7-v,/- 

Then' uai a toft arid ptntlvt gl 
A Cast of l/jought upon her faec. 
S. M. A. 

Ward Smith - - - Gardner, North Dakota 
/I bmy man is the only one who has time to do anything. 
Trowel, M. A. P. 



WALTER Thomi - Mount Joy, Pennsylvania 

Afy honor h ni> life; both grou in &U, 
Glee Club. 



lUfGAAKD Schwartz - . Menomonie, Wisconsin 

Sweet and graciotu even in common speeeh. 
Philomathean President, Marquctte-I aSalle, Science 
Club. 

CU ViKKiKM - - . Oshkosh. Wisconsin 

"Frana" 

Here comes the lady! O, so light a foot 

Will ne'er wear OUt the tVtrlgstmg flint. 

S. S. A. Secretary, W. A. A. President, S. M. A., 

M. A. P. 

ANN* di YoNO - - - Creston, Montana 

Patience is a remedy for tury mrrow. 
] typerian. 

Iluu.m Silvils - - - Marshall, Minnesota 

Hi eould raise ICTUpltl dark and mie. 
And after salve 'em in a trice. 
Metallurgy, Gym Team, Rifle Club, DeMolay. 






11929 



*ai 






4 



Fred Short - - rVfenomonie, Wisconsin 

We know little of him, but that little is good. 
Y. M. C. A., Trowel. 



PhyLUS Linn ... Ishpeming, Michigan 

"Pbiliy" 
My ionl must be clothed in song, 
V'ir I am happ\ all day long. 
Areme, S. M. A. 



Bi-x-knadeen Cusiiman - - Whitehall, Wisconsin 

"Burn" 
1/ sparkles and glitters — a beautiful stone, 
And on Sundays and Wednesdays she's never alnnr. 
M. A. P. 



Edvard Fivecoate 



"Ed' 



Menomonie, Wisconsin 



Never forward ill anything but bit duty, and always there. 

Metallurgy. 

Julian Johnson - Wilson, Wisconsin 

"Dodo" 
O sleep! it is a gentle thing. 
Beloved from pole to pole. 
S. S. A. President. 

Mi i in Louise Larson - - St. Paul, Minnesota 
A noticeable girl with Urge, grey eyes. 
S. M. A. President. 

Margaret Johnson - Iowa Falls, Iowa 

"Peggy" 
She 11 tars the rott of youth upon her. 
Student Advisory Board, Athletic Council. 

Jirrv Vojta .... Rice Lake, Wisconsin 
"ferry" 
Describe him who can, 

An abridgement of all that was pleasant in man. 
Y. M. C. A. 




1929 







Sally Martin - - Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 

Vtriity ii the i cry spire of life. 
S. M. A. 



Victor Glenn - - - - la FargB, Wisconsin 
•Vic" 
Men of feu Hindi are the Pitt "leu. 
Band, Trowel. 



Norman Olson 



Menomonie, Wisconsin 



'Tom" 



Air and maiiiiii are more txpretfivt than north. 
Tower. Glee Club. Band, VI. A. P., Football. 



SENIORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR 
Vi ihMi Ahonbn 

Roy Bartholomew 
Frances Grbeu y 

fl'u ii r JZSKI 
Price Larson 
Milker Shogren 
Koi.i r Tasklr 
Hartuick Swanson 
Dorothy Bahr 

hi i ii Dof.rinc 
Mrs. Grace Dow 
Thilda Gjf.rde 
Lena K m utson 
Clara Schofnoff 
Vk IMI RFD Spracue 

Ruby Starr 

Nina Van Houten 

Marian White 



1929 



I 




Juniors 



■^ 






M 



Juniors 

AY the Junior Class ever aspire to greater heights and may approval follow our 
earnest efforts. This is no time for reminiscence, for intensive restrospection 
may be a sign of approaching old age 

We arc a- a builder hewing his stone to-day, that to-morrow h; may build 
a palace: even 90 we are polishing the rough material with which to upheld a standard 
of learning, skill, industry, and honor which our profession strives to attan. 

Tomorrow will be a new day. but its success depends largely upon to-dav's efforts. 
In the light of this truth we look upon this year's experiences not for what they mean 
as history in 1929. but for their significance a decade hence. 



C I ASS OI IK I RS 



Ralph Schai 11 

Ml! DRl I) Bl 1 IN \ 

I niua Sttndt 
Arnold Stori 

Mr. Davison 
Miss Vasolo 



I- 



President 
•President 
Secretary 

7'r.JW/nr 

Faculty Advisers 










11929 



Pat' t' 



^\J 






Mi: (>Ki i> Bi:in\ - - - Owatonna. Minnesota 

"wuy 

Thou hast a mind that uiiti 
With thy fair and oufujrd character. 
M. A. P.. S. M. A.. Marqucttc-LaSalle. 

Chf.stfr Brown - - - Hibbiog, Minnesota 

And when a lady's in the case 
You know all other things giie place. 
M. A. P.. Metallurgy, Football, Glee Club. 



Edith Bri vw 



"Bra ' 



Star-buck. Minnesota 



ioti her uork with a will. 
Philomathean. 



Sidney O 






Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



The fruit derited from labor it the sweetest of all plt4 



Loyde Child* ... Eau Claire. Wi* 
Good nature and Rood taisr arc usually companions. 



r\ Cadican 






Casco. Wisconsin 



Few things are impossible to diligence and skili. 
Secretary Marquette-LaSalle. 



• ~K - - - Menomonie, \\ '■. 
Life is not life at all without del;- 
W. A. A.. S. M. A. 



Winifred Cooplr - - - Colfax. Wist 

"Winnie" 
Her face betokened all things dear and good. 
W. A. A.. Y. V. C A.. Glee Club. Hypcrian. 

" ' 1929 ^= 











Page 41 




Kathryn Counsell - Oconomowoc, Wisconsin 

"Kath" 

GeniU of speech, beneficimt of wind; 

Another like her would be bard to find. 

Science Club, Hyperian, Y. V- C. A. Cabinet. 

Ruth Cm go ... Menomonic, Wisconsin 

To be efficient in a quirt ways 
That is my tint throughout tht ivy. 



Whitewater, Wisconsin 

,-1 genial dhpotitioH bringl itt own reward mid many friends. 
S. T. S., Ritle Club. 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 
"Sftvm" 
Our enthusiastic cheer leader never yet could rest. 
Till the eutirt icljool were like himself possessed. 
Tower, Cheer Leader. 

Chetck, Wisconsin 

Though unobtrusite, he has rnadt his mark. 
Rifle Club. 

Mildred Dincci - - Kilbourn, Wisconsin 

"Pitikee" 
Fine people, like fine tends, Hard no trumpet, 
Science Club, Philomathean. 

Ruth DoOGl - Mcnonmnie, Wisconsin 

Earnest, conscientious effort brings itt nun reward. 
Secretary Junior Class, Science Club. 



I)w Evans - - - Mankara, Minnesota 

Perseverance is the stepping ttoni to success. 

Basket-ball, S. T. S. 



*p 



/ 



Hazm PLACET - Fergus Fall*, Minnesota 

A good laugh and a great bift smile 
Are urih her all the while. 
Glee Club, Science Club, Philomathean. 



Ffrdinand Franz - - Mountain Lake, MinncM>t,i 

Am/ lie's liked uhii is alike to ill. 
M. A. P.. Men'l Cllec Club. 



Mary Ghi i v - - - Menomonic, Vi'isconiin 

Music hall) charms; 
So hath a musician. 
Hypcriani, Inky Fingers. 



Makjorie Funk ... Menomonie, Wisconsin 
"Mar?' 

Mtrry n tat dny h long. 

Glee Club. 



Jane Hamuli v .... Ramsey, Michigan 
To know her oitcr is to like btr allia)>. 
Glee Club, S. M. A. 



Alblrt Gii i i n 



LaCnttK. Wisconsin 



■M" 



The world fa mtdl to he tajoytd, and I nidke the most of it. 
M. A. P., Assistant Athletic Manager, S. T. S., 
Metallurgy. 

Iiikikliii Hansln ... Duluth, Minnesota 

She re present i diligence exemplified. 
M. A. P.> Science Club. Philomathean. 



ESTHER SlCKIIK - - Alma Center. Wisconsin 

Friendly toward all. ruth manner meet. 
The kind of girl yon like to meet. 




119291 



fage -is 



a* 



/ 



' 




Clayton Hai.vfr.sox - - Madison. Wisconsin 

"Clsyt" 

He is a born leader and mailer of men. 
S. S. A. Treasurer. 

Margukriti. Hart ... Hannibal, Missouri 

it's nice In hi natural u-heu yen are luiitrjlly vice. 
S. M. A. 



Ruth Ltndall St. Paul, Minneson 

Sweet an J gracious, ri in ru common speech. 
President Lutheran Student Association, Hyperian. 
W. A. A. 

Raymond Juncck - - Mcnomunic, Wisconsin 

"Ha\" 

Speech h great, but tilenct h greater. 



Gordon- Johnson - - Eau Claire, Wisconsin 

We give you credit for ability, and lots of it. 

Tower, 5. T. 5., Y. M, C. A., Lutheran Student As- 
sociation. 

Irm\ Nichols ... Mencimonic, Wisconsin 

She* I not one for fins and feather* 
Or for standing on review. 
Bill she's btny every minute 
When >/>■■ bus a job to do. 
Stoutonia, S. M. A., M. A. P. 

Hi mii Kinnon - - Gilman, Wisconsin 

"Hank" 
He duelleth ru a realm of thought 
Beyond the world of words. 
Gym Team; Y, M. C. A. 

Rudy Kocl St. Paul, Minnesota 

This is hit oil -repeated rhyme: 

"Ca-cdiiealnni H the thief of lime," 



rage u 



1929 



fc>s 



' 



4 



Ei V* Page .... Elk River, Minnesota 

"Petet" 

Beneath in r timet ness lies true sincerity. 
Glee Club, Science Club- Philomathean. 

Gould Morrison - - - ] libbinp. Minnesota 

"Mac" 

Wbstevet bt did wax dont with w rnuct rase, 

In him alone 'twill natural to please, 

DcMolay, Athletic Council, Captain Elect for Football. 

John Nothom ... Arkansaw, Wisconsin 

"lack" 
Still waters run Jeep. 



VtOLL ttl Parsons - - River Falls, Wisconsin 

hi oer titeuce reigns supreme. 



Aalo i Mof - Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

"Al(h" 
She trips a light fantastic toe. 
S. M. A. 

.1 Minnurr - Madison, Wisconsin 

A good, honest, friendly fellow, 
The kind you Me to know. 



Orlando Paciotti - Gilbert, Minnesota 

"Path" 
Our hands are full of business. 
Tower, Football, Athletic Council, S. T. 5, 



Al. Poi i i i\c,i it - LaCrostC, Wisconsin 

/ never Jure to write as funny m I can. 
Stoutunia, M. A. P.. S. T. S.. Cheer Leader. 







\ 



Z1929 



Pag* 4$ 




HELCI RaSMUSSEN - Racine, Wisconsin 

"Heine" 
Thou best a toice u it bin 
That ever whisper* — work end win. 
Science Club, Glee Club, Y. W. C. A. 

HERBERT Stolp ... Rochester, Minnesota 

"Herb" 
Yottf words become your person, 
Sccutonia, DeMolay. 



Km I'll Si iivliu - - Union Grov?, Wisconsin 

A jolly good fellow u ill) friends galore. 
President Junior Class, Basket-ball. 



CHARLES Strong ... Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 
His words i'iv bonds; 
///. htert as far from fraud as heaven from earth. 



Miivin Sho&ren - Superior, Wisconsin 

He ul"> knows when to be silent is a wise man. 
Metallurgy, Trowel. 



Blulah Todi> ... Houston, Minnesota 

PotseuHlg boneii north and pure, good sense; 
Fair, but not proud, and learned without pretense. 



Akvoi.D Stori ... Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

A little work, a little play 
To keep sis going every day. 
M. A. P., Treasurer Junior Class, S. T. S. 

HmuhIi TAUI MAN - - Mcnomonie, Wisconsin 

"Bozzy" 

Rare compound of oddity, frolic, and fun'. 

Who relished a joke and rejoiced in a pun. 

Stoutonia, DeMolay, Band, S. T, S., Men's Glee Club. 



Page f6 



3/929 



*s> 



Mary Fox Elgin, Illinois 

AV'tT was a lass more genial and happy than the. 
S. M. A. 



LAWRENCE Johnson- - - Mcnomonic, Wisconsin 

"l.»nin" 

A ipecialht in ditposhtg of glnom. 
He brings good cheer into every room. 
M, A. P-, Athletic Manager. 



Sidney Hlath 



"SiY" 



Wells, Minnesota 



The world's no better if tie worry; 

I ife's no longer if wt hurry. 
Football. 

Marcarlt Cases - - Bloomington, Wisconsin 
"Casey" 
A combination of fun, ability, and brain. 
Marquette-LaSalle. 

HENRIETTA Sn vi rt - - Marinette, Wisconsin 

"Henry" 

There is nothing ill can dwell in such a temple. 
Hypcrian, Glee Club, Y. W. C. A. 



Am r i Lavcrton 



-n,.r 



M c nomon ie, Wi sc o n s i n 



Oh with the Jance! Let joy be uncon fined. 
M. A. P., S. M. A. 

Rom rt Thi ir.i r - - Tomahawk. Wisconsin 

"Toby" 
Ready and true in eiery need, 
Hitch men tixy say, are friends indeed. 
Tower, President. Mirqucttc-LaSalle. 



Victor Gi i mi 



"V,(- 



La Farge, Wiscon? 



Men <>! few words are the best men. 




\\929\ 



mm 






•^ 




Eovim Kahtak 



"Erf" 



St. Paul, Minnesota 



The force of bis own merit made bis way. 
Metallurgy. 



\.«i i Winn ... - Whitewater, Wisconsin 

"I Innkey" 
/-r,n MM it a lohime if ytm km/it how to read him. 



I/. Mil 111 TlllllMS 



Menomonic. Wisconsin 



"lib' 



Pleasure and action make the bonrt teem short. 
M. A. P., S. M. A. 



Alma Win*i-.r 



Heron lake, Minnesota 



"A\" 



Six takcth delight :« domestic tcience; 
learning to cook for iuo. 
Science Club, Philomathcan. 

lirBiKT Wyatt - Valley, Washington 

Earnest in every fffoYtfl or; 
A hard worker and a good fellow. 



Vii 1 1 am Wing j i 



Bill" 



Amery, Wisconsin 



To be of sen let rather than conspicuous. 
Metallurgy, Trowel. 

Thfoihjri Wi-i.andir - - Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

"Ted" 

Exceedingly wise, feir-tpohtn, end persiusive. 



Ivzrnia Forslukd - LaCrosse, Wisconsin 

"Vernu" 
folly in disposition, and loyal in friendship. 
Philomathcan, Y. W. C. A. 









■ 



Page 48 



E.I929 



*SB 



IL'MOKS WH0S1 PICTURE'S DO NOT A!'i 

I'm 00ORI AND] 
Frank Hai ¥1 rsox 

lilNRT HOULE 

Kf \M IH I'M II RSON 

I E0NAR.D Pawi icki 
S SCI! AFf-NER 

Helen Costello 

M w.i i SAKDVIG 

Vioii i ii Pae* 

kwmi i \ Shannon 




19291 



Pate *> 




DIKI An: 
Prom Quern 



GOLI.I) MOKRKON' 

Prom 



The Third Annual Junior Prom 

THE Third Annual Junior Prom was hold on Saturday evening. April twentieth. 
In a ballroom which was decorated in Chinese effects, a record aggregation 
danced to the music of Brant's Hot Points of Wells. Minnesota. A fine social 
atmosphere prevailed throughout the evening; students and gu.'sts declared the 
party a most pleasurable occasion. 



THE COMMITTEE CHAIRMI \ 



Gould Morrison 
Chlstir Brow \ 
GORDON Johnson 
Al Poklinci k 
A. Stori ( 
G. Hansi n I 
Ki nni mi Dim 

Elizabeth Wn i iams - 

RoBl RT Till II I K 

T VI R< )NS AND PATRONESSES 

President and Mrs. B. 1 •'. Xelson 
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bowman 
Miss Ruth Michaels 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Davison 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold I.autner 



General Chairman 
Entertainment 

Decoration 

Program* 
Finance 



Reception 

Refreshment 
Publicity 

CHAPERONES 

Mr. R. L Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Good 

Miss L. M. Baker 

Miss M. R. Mm/ 



11929 



Page y> 





opfjomoreg 






^ 



Sophomores 



SERVICE in a noble cause always gives the donor a sense of prida and satisfaction. 
When we have given OUT best lor our school, we can be justly proud that we have 
supported a worthy enterprise and that the best will return to us. 

Many avenues have been open to us for the exercising of our talents; athletics, 
band, glee ciubs. and other extra curricular activities have enrolled quota of 

Sophomores. We appreciate the wide field of opportunities for physical and mental 
expansion. 

It is our desire, in every way, to augment the spirit of Stout, and 
an integral part of the organization which constitutes the Stout Student Body. 

We realize that the fellowship of man with man is of inestimable value .\nd that 
the acquaintances of our college career will form lasting bonds, treasured memories 
which will be an enduring source of much pleasure. Campus social life has done con- 
siderable to extend our circle of friends; rooting at an athletic contest, talking in friend- 

• ups. or having a jolly good time at the week end dances. — each has had its part 
in making our school life mere enjoyable and comph 






CLASS OFFICERS 



\\ II I ARD I Ian 

kNOR Ovi RBI 

Bl l II I)'' 
ERNI si Mi i i i k 
Mr. Van Pi i i i \ 

Mi k\ \ Mu i i r 



Vice-President 
Secretary 

- Treasurer 



- Faculty Advisors 




Pa t t £J 




R 


HaKcn 


i Overby 


\\ 


Hansen 


\Y 


Arnold 


\ 


Asxk-rson 


II. K, 


E. 




1 . 


Julin 


(■: 


Muller 


I. Edingcr 


R. 


Wallin 


I>. 


\\ illiama 


\. 


Danirow 


R. Berger 


1.. 




K. 




i.. 


Chriatenaen 


v Gundlach 


M 


Mel tillough 


L 


\ nxlaini 



liner 
F. Babcock 
I*. Zimmerman 

..|<!> 
( ;. Swant 



- 



/'..,.• *.- 



iw/a 








l'«te 53 









rtland 



K. 1 
.iter W 

I.. Wi IV. I 






K. ! 
K. I. 










Sophomores Whose Pictures Do Not Appear 



O. 



LOIS BUN KIR 
BAR HI R 
ARCHIE BR ATI AND 
BLAIR BRONSTAI) 
0RVILL1 cumin 
THOM SON 

i U< IAN PAU1 US 



REX ENG1 
FLOYD GARTON 
ALBERT GOODRICH 
JAMES HANLE\ 

ROBERT KISn 
MABEL POTTER 
ROLAND FISCH 



( ! MRE KNL 

WALTER KUBE« 

HARRII I 

LSHALL MILLE1 
MAYNARD MOTT 
NORMAN PETERSON 
HARRY V 






"5 



13 



k > 








Page <6 







k 



4? 





jfrestymen 



w 



Freshmen 



E OF the Freshmen class do feel fully initiated into college life. During the 
past school year we have tasted the first of our college joys and sorrows, and 
we rind the sampling good. 



The tendency is for us to review our first year at The Stout Institute 
with an uncalled-for feeling of bravado. Looking back, we may consider the accom- 
plishments of the year momentous; however, we realize that the demands of the future 
will be increasingly great, and. although our work has been well done, we have yet 
many enjoyable problems to solve before we will have become alumni of this institu- 
tion. 

W e gladly admit that September found us very green indeed. — susceptible to 
Sophomore hazing and the ravages of homesickness. But we have outgrown all of that. 
Wc have made new friends .xnel we are fairly well acclimated to the Stout way of 
doing things. Our green caps arc about to be supplanted by the complementary red of a 
Sophomore Banner, and the Class of *}} will do its utmost to uphold the honor and 
dignity of its position throughout the succeeding year. 



( LASS OFFICERS 



W'll 1 IWI Mic HEELS 

Caroi M< Cl lrc 
Pali. Kabot 
Marian Cw sn 

Mr. I'm iis ) 

Miss Bai i ki m \ 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

- Idiltlt; 




119291 










KLo£ tftOfr JUtfo- 






*ai 







{JUL w^^yU/ 



Biwcr 



i i man 

II. i 

K Wcidcnfdkr 



A. A 

■ cilia ir, 

M. V. 

Jcott 



\V. 1! 



M. Andcr*or. 
klnii 
ikaen 



H929 



Page 60 







H. Rose 
V. Volp 
A. Ida 
Senty 






rson /» a. \.?. . 1 i>inion»o» r 

K>n / NcWiyf/2/-^ 

re gjU^Ai^- HjftSfcfcjj ^^ C. S*buriu <* 



K. Swoyer 

: L ::.■ :; 

T. Hooper 

K. Lravilt 

A. Ijtrton 



& 



* • 












Page 61 



N 







ilill 





i . w 



i i \i stud] n rs 

\ H 

K. Cairclli 




SPECIAL STUD1 \ is WHOSE PICTURJ S DO NO! VPP1 \K 






M. I.:illi:uii 
K. Ri 

I!. Sai 



( . tlocrncmann 



Mrv A. Carter 



FRES1 [Ml N W 1 U >M 1M( TURES DO N( > I M'l'I AR 



!'«r«rth 



I.. I! 

I'. La 

l» Lind 

A I 

P. Mann 



i .. Rasabach 
l. Rn 



I.. II 

s ■•: 
II. v. 



11929* 






College 

Organizations 
^Vtblctics 




Hfoitcr 



This for Honor, the root of government, the fundamental principle of righteous 
respect, and the basis of all lasting faith. 




©epilations 



,4 M^' , 



■^ L y v 



















Tftomemaking 



7*/>f greatest of all organizations h the home, the true happiness of which h 

found in the simplicity of family life. And here ue are well agreed, that a tbotx 
men may build an encampment, but it takes a woman j home. 



**■ 



Stout Student Association 

THE Stout Student Association of 1928-29 has endeavored to carry out. according 
to the constitution, the purpose of this major school organization. It has always 
tried to make this a bigger and better Stout by constant co-operation with the 
administration. During this year the purpose of this organization has been to 
Carry out the assigned duties. These duties were discharged by the four officers, as elect- 
ed by the association members; namely, the secretary and the treasurer, who were 
elected in the spring of 1?28, and the president and the vice-president, who were elected 
during the second week of school in the fall term. 

The major purposes of the organization are fourfold: to provide smoothness in 
the discharge of student activities through scheduling all school and social events on 
both a weekly and yearly calendar; to distribute to the Band. Men's Glee Club. Girls' 
Glee Club. Manual Arts Players. Athletic Association, Lyceum, Stoutonia, and the Stout 
Student Association the money received at registration time as an activity fee; to issue 
to the members of the Stout Student Association the master tickets which give admit- 
tance to entertainments sponsored by the above organizations; to take charge of all 
student assemblies; and to organize plans for Homecoming and Commencement. 

Any student, faculty member, or member of the office staff, with the members of 

mmediate family, may become a member of the association by paying the activity 
fee of four dollars per semester. 

Homecoming of this year 1928-29, was celebrated on October 19, 20. and 21. 

The Stout Student Association officers in charge of the event laid plans and distributed 

the work to various committees and organizations. The 1928 Homecoming celebration 

d .1:1 overwhelming success and was. without doubt, the largest event 

- kind ever held at the college. 

The officers of the Stout Student Association wish to thank the faculty and stud- 
ent body for the fine spirit and constant co-operation displayed during the entire 
year. It is only through these means that it will be possible to maintain a strong 
organization and to uphold the high standards of our Alma Mater. 




1929 



Pa S t 64 



*8I 
















1929 



Pact 65 



"^ 









Homecoming 

October 19 and 20 marked two 
of the most exciting days of the 
year on the Stout campus. 

Friday w over to the 

completion of Homecoming dec- 
orations. The entrances and main 
corridor of the Home Economics 
building soon became a grand array 
of autumn hues. The cafeteria 
was transformed into a Mardi Gras 
banquet hall of red. orange, yellow, 
and green. Clusters of gay balloons 
shimmered in the light of clever 
lanterns. The gym became a state- 
ly ballroom of our royal colors. 
Blue and White. All day the stu- 
dents extended hearty welcomes to 
returning alumni. 

At S o'clock, alumni, faculty, 
students, and towns-folk filed into 
the auditorium to see "The Pa: 
presented by the Manual Arts Play- 
ers. Now we know that "there's 
no use crying over spilt milk, cuz 
there's too much water in it al- 
ready." 

Twenty minutes after the cur- 
tain fell the Legion drum corps 
was playing; the Student Body as- 
sembled in sleeping attire; and 
Crowds lined the streets. On to the 
it Bonfire, the pajamaites zig- 
;ed and cheered. In the daz- 
zling light of the roaring blaze, 
which broke high in the heavens, 
the traditional and solemn matri- 
monial ceremony at last happily 
united the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men. Pep was high and midnight 
came too soon. 



11929 1 



Page 66 



*» 



Saturday's program put forth a 
compact series of events, backed by 
an ideal day of warmth and still 
blue skies. After a morning of 
many successful gatherings, alumni 
and students met in the auditorium 
for a mass meeting. Pep and en- 
thusiasm scored again. 

An impressive alumni luncheon 
was served at noon in the parlors 
of the Mabel Taintcr Memorial. 

One of the best parades ever wit- 
nessed on the streets of Mcnomonie 
made its way to the football field. 
The game marked the climax of the 
day's excitement which did not die 
even as the gun went off and Stout 
w.is defeated by Stevens Point 25 
to 7. 

The disappointment over the 
score was soon forgotten when the 
clappers and whistles of the bril- 
liant banquet hall filled the air. 

On with the dance, and until 
midnight the Dreamland Live W 
furnished syncopated rhythms 
which appropriately finished a glo- 
rious day. 

With the exception of the bon- 
fire picture, the scenes on these 
pages are reproductions of floats 
from the Homecoming Day parade. 
Almost every organization w.is rep- 
resented by a float. The M. A. P.'s 
received first prize with their rep- 
resentation of a triumphal entry in 
true Roman style. The second 
prize was awarded to I.ynwood 
Hall, and the third to the Science 
Club. 




11929 



Pate 67 






The Stout Student Association Advisory Board 

THIS year rinds the Stout Student Association Advisory Board completing its third 
year of existence. As is verj evident, more and more matters pertaining to stu- 
dent life and student affairs have been delegated to this group. The board con- 
sists of four regularly elected officers of the Stout Student Association and one 
man and one woman elected by each of the four classes, Freshman, Sophomore. Junior, 
and Senior. The board is an official arm of th; Stout Student Association, and also 
represents the students through their class organizations. The president of the Stout 
Student Association is cx-omcio president of the Student Board. 

In carrying out its work. th„- Advisory Board acts in conference and co-operation 
with the Faculty Committee on College Organization. This committee consists of the 
Director of the School of Industrial Arts, the Director of the School of Household Arts, 
and four members of the facult) chosen by the president of the colli- 



STOUT STUDENT ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 



Julian Johnson 

! ii NRIETTA BRAKI.R 
FRANCI s Yi km kk! 
A ION Hm VI RSON 



- President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



CLASS REPRESENT VI IV 1 s 



St';. 

Lucille Hagerty 
Jeancttc Jackson 
Fred Decker 

Sophomores 
Adele Lanckton 
Hilbcrt Wva:: 



J in: 
Lucille Milcr 
John Barber 

Katherine Graslie 
Stanlev Guelson 



19: 









■ 









LuciLi-z Mit.cn 





Fhed DECncn 




Julian N. Johnson 



5 A S 

Advisory 
Board 



Lucille hAxniY Clayton tlALvcnsoN 




Frances ttnnenne 









■ 



The 1929 Tower Staff 

THIS annual is a happy reminder of the past school year. It has required consider- 
able effort to produce the book, but we may consider the production very worth 
while, and the satisfaction now derived has more than repaid the staff for its 
efforts. 
However, this business of Tower building is a co-operative enterprise. The stu- 
dent body is dependent upon the staff for the finished book; the staff members, in turn, 
must be aided by an enthusiastic student group. This system has worked out nicely; 
we hope that you have enjoyed the feature events of the year to such an extent that 
the 1930 staff may proceed with confidence in planning numbers for your entertainment 
and for the financial benefit of the following volume. 



; 



THE 

Douglas Harris 
Pearl Lin dm i 
Orlando Paciotti 
Walter Jbsre 

III I ian I Ivi i AND 

!1 \ Chill KK II 

Robert Tin n i r 
Toby Emi RSON 
Frances s< hroi di r 

Wind ri d ARNOLD 

Henrietta Quii.i in*. 
Elizabfth Dooli y 
Carol SlEBERNS j 
Katherine Grasi ii ' 
Gordon Johnson , 

W'll LIAM SOLXII ( 



1929 TOWER STAFF 

Managing Editor 
Associate Editor 

Business Man 
Advertising Mam 

Organization Editor 

■ ionization Editors 

At blc tic Editor 
Editor 

E cat lire Editor 

Asst. Feature Editor 

Art Editor 
Art Assistants 

Panels and Lettering 



FACULTY ADVISORS 

Gertrude Cai i am an .... Editorial Adviser 
C. W. Hague ..... Business Adiiser 



\y zy l 



Pane To 




^s-ss* 



*\* 



The Stoutonia 



HpHE STOUTONIA. weekly publication of The Stout Institute, is the medium of 
expression through which the activities of the campus arc made available to stu- 
dents and outside subscribers. 

During the week of March 15, THE STOUTO\I\ celebrated the four- 
teenth anniversary of its existence as .\n extra-curricular activity of The Stou: Institute. 
In these fourteen years. THE STOUTON1 \ has made considerable progress, and each 
new volume is material evidence of the effort being constantly put forth to Improve it. 
The staff of THE STOUTONIA is composed of students who find the work per- 
sonally enjoyable and beneficial in the development of the art of expression through the 
written word. The personnel of the staff strives, through persistent effort, to fulfill its 
aim of giving its readers the most timely material of : the most complete and 

reliable form. 



EDITORIAL STAFE 



Enoch C. Harter - 

Nu HOLS 

Ernest Chris i i nsi n 
Eleanor Overby 
Bi rnhard Hai.i \ 

W'lMI RI I) ARXOl I) 

Lester Haw ki s 
Hi rbert Stoi p 

Hi RNK i Brk klr 

Edwin Riid I 

Wii i iwi Soli u 
Harold Tali m \\ ■ 
Eloise Larson 
KaTHI i I N I INl> 
Mr. John Iwii.i.i. Jr. 

Miss Helen Sarchi r 



Managing I 
A 

Neu s Editors 

iitors 

Athletic* 

Features 

Ganges 
- Humor 

So, . 
Cartoonist 

Ad\ 



\iSS STAFF 






.< is Will : 

Mario McCuLLOUGH 

Ai Poellinger 

Kim Riggs 

rAROINER 

R.OBI RI Rl u K 
Carl Roll s 

C. W. Haci i - 



Business Man* 
Ait trtising 
Asst. Adx erti 

Makeup Foreman 
Circulation 

Circulation .'■ 

- 






Page 7t 






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The Stout Typographical Society 

A MAJOR interest in a major field, the Stout Typographical Society has become 
a helpful organization for those who are interested in the field of printing. The 
men benefit not only from the advantages to be derived from this society, which 
offers information and knowledge concerning printing, publishing, and prob- 
lems confronting teachers of printing, but also enjoy the closer co-operation and fel- 
lowship with its members. 

In the four years of its existence, this organization has grown to be one of the 
most active organizations in the school. It includes in its membership practically every 
man enrolled in advanced Courses in printing. There are three different degrees granted 
by the society, given only to the members who through persistent effort and study have 
proved themselves worthy of the various stages in development. The degrees granted 
arc respectively: Apprentice, Journeyman, and Master. Upon initiation the member 
automatically becomes an apprentice, and further advancement is acquired only through 
the successful passing of a special examination. 

The SOCi< lies bi-monthh on Wednesday evenings. Assisting in the prob- 

lems ot the club arc men who have been successful teachers or workers in the trade, 
and who freely offer to the club the benefit of their experience. The outstanding social 
event in each semester is the initiation of new members. This organization has in the 
past sponsored many school dances. 



First Semester 
Walter Jeski 
Pku i Larson 

Ki \\i in Dim 



01 1 ICERS 
I tut 
ident 
tary -Treasurer 

Adi iter 

Mr. C. W . I I ■ 



ond Stiii 
- Ki with Dirt 

Ki \ i Rk.cs 
Franc is |i i in 



AI POELLINGER 

BURI HANKs 
HAROLD TAU1 
ROBERT RM( K 
VIRDEN K.WIM 
* u Tl R JESKI 

< II HARTIR 
PRK I. I ARSON 
THOMAS JUNG< K 
LEO GARDINI R 



ROM ( \1 I 

R U BERG 

I -VI RETT HARRIS 

. I VANS 
JOHN RUD! 
KI WITH DIM 
DAYI 1IIRIR 
FRANK NOV \ s( ONE 
JAY PRIEST 
HI RNHARD HAG! N 
I )( )!)(,! 



PI II R ZIMM1 RMAN 

\l \RIO \K< l! | 
!RAN( IS II I IX 
I. V. AHONI N 
[OHN 1 AKso 
I Ml GALOFF 
DOUGLAS HARRIS 
KIN I RIGGS 

MI) < OTTON 
ORLANDO PA< IOTTI 



/'«<• 74 



11929 "» 







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The Stout Athletic Council 

THE Stout Athletic Council is an organization whose chief purpose is to determine 
the athletic policies of the school. It aims to encourage all forms of athletics, 
both intercollegiate and intramural. The awards of letters, emblems, and mon- 
ograms are specified and controlled by this committee. 
Faculty representatives are appointed by the college president. They constitute a 
standing committee whose personnel remains the same from year to year. Two student 
representatives are elected from each class; they hold office for one year. 



Floyd Ki iim 
I wi i Kyle 



Chairman 

Secretary 



FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES 
F. Keith, S. E. Paulus, H. Balerud. C A. Bowman, 
R. E. Michaels. M. \\". \.xn I\ 



STUDENT MEMBERS 



Seniors: O. Duffin, M. Johnson 
Juniors: R. Lindall, O. Paciotti 



Sophomores: I). Williams. \\". Gardiner 
Irishmen: E. Schwartz, J. Kyle 



Page ;6 






** 






G CALLA "CtlMIDT 5AfKH 





■ '1££LAN> 



INKY 
FINGERS 







V ARNOLD 




/itt D. Dmcncn 



rf - M.C 







1929 



Page 77 






The Manual Arts Players 

THE Manual Arts Players have completed another happy and successful season. 
The Commencement play presented on May 25. LJ 28, was one of the most beau- 
tiful plays ever seen in the Stout Auditorium. It was the romantic comedy, 
"Smilin* Through." The opening dramatic event of the 1928-29 season was 
the presentation of the sparkling comedy. "The Patsy." Early in December the club 
offered an unusually attractive play for the Christmas season. "The Prince Chap." On 
March IS. a character comedy entitled "Kempy" was given as a spring feature. 

One of the most significant projects of the year in dramatics at Stout was the 
participation of the Manual Arts Players in the state-wide Play Tournament of the 
Wisconsin Dramatic Guild. The selected play, "A Ian and Two Candlesticks." was 
presented in the Stout Auditorium on March nineteenth, and then entered in the four- 
day Tournament at Madison on March twenty-third. The entire trip was financed by 
the club, and members felt rewarded for their efforts. The production was distinctive 
in artistic values, and was placed second in the state finals. Members of the cast were 
Janet Kyle, Eugene Mel cod. and Albert Hansen. 



OFFICERS 



Miss Lilian Bakir 

I'OLLLINCIR 
'RED BeLIN <i 

Elizabeth Williams 
Chester Brown 
iard Hagi n 



BAKKi'K. [< 
BI.IINA. MILDRED 
BRAK1 R. HI NRII TTA 
BROWN. C MISTER 
CHRIs 

COCK FK II I. ALICE 
CRESS, MARIAN 
CUSHMAN. BEURNA 
I IM HER, ROLAND 
IRAN/. | i RDINAND 

DINER. LEO 
GILL! S, AI BERT 

\. BER.NHARD 



MEMBERS 

HANSEN, EMMA 
HANSEN, GERTRUDE 
HAS! ! RUD, Al 
HENRY, DORIS 

JOHNsON. 1 AW Rl 
KYI. I. IANI I 
I ANC KTON, ADM J 
Mcl EOD, 

LFRG, ( AROL 
Mil I AR. MARSHALL 
MILLER, ERNEST 
MURRAY, 
NICHOLS. IRMA 



Director 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Business Man. 



OLSON. NORMON 
POELLINGER, AL 

UDI . RA1 
sc HROEDI R. FRANCES 
SIMONSON, MARIE 
SMITH. WARD 
STETZER, mi I N 
STORI. ARNOLD 
SOGGE. EMMA 
VERKERKJ ES 

will LAMS, ELIZABETH 
HAGGARD, MUDRED 
HANSEN, ALBERT 



1929 






Page 78 



^Ltzt: (L~~A- L,^ ^L^ ^J-fs4J^J UJ^ 




Pat* 79 



*d 










Sarah Wayne 
Mary Clare 



"Smilin' Through" 

A ROMANTIC COMEDY 

By Alan Mar tin 

PRESENTED BY Till MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 
IS \ ( OMM1 NCEMEN1 M \ICRI . mav 2 5. 1928 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
The Prologue 



John Carteret 
Dr. Owen Harding 
Ellen 

Kathleen Dungannon 
Willie Ainley ' 
Kenneth Wayne 
Jeremiah Wayne 
Moonvccn Clare 



Wedding Guests 



THE PLAY 



"While two eyes so true 

Come smilin' through — 

A« me!" 



abeth Williams 
Frances Scbroeder 



Norman Olson 

War shall Millar 

Ruth Cooper 

Corene Bayshtger 

Lav rence Johnson 

Ray Werner 

- Esttlle Curry 

- I. lie/!: Hagi 

Adele Lanckton 

Mildred Belina 

Henrietta Broker 

William Jahnke 

Kenneth Patterson 

Ernest Muller 






Peg* $o 







"The Patsy" 



A COMEDY IN THREE ACTS 
By Barry Connors 

PRESENTED BY THE MANUAL ARTS PLAYERS 
AS A HOMECOMING Fl ITURE, OCTOBER 19, 1928 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Mr. Harrington 

Mrs. Harrington 
Grace Harrington 
Patricia Harrington 
Billy Caldwell 
Tony Anderson 



Ward Smith 

Mildred Bclina 

Beurttadet n ( 'tubman 

Frances Scbroeder 

Chester Broun 
Ernat Cbriitensen 



"No use crying over spilled milk — for 
there's enough water in it already.*' 



119291 



I'uxe ft 






Stout Metallurgy Club 



THIS year marks the fifth anniversary of the Metallurgy Club. The organization 
strives to be helpful to students interested in metals and metal working by bring- 
ing them together in friendly discussion groups, and by presenting the more re- 
cent developments of the metal industry in orderly topic form. The members 
realize a benefit both through their participation and through listening to the reports 
of experienced metal workers who have appeared on many of the club's programs. 

However, the Metallurgy docs not seek to be merely a study organization. The 
club sponsors many social events among its own members as well as occasional all school 
entertainments. 

* The Stout Metallurgy has been growing steadily in importance and numbers, and 
each member feels amply repaid for the effort which he has expended in order that 
his org.ini/.uion may thrive. 



Ol I ICIRS 



i'm i raldo cair1 ii i 
Chester Bro* n 
Edwin Kartak 

ChARLIS RllNHOLD 
I.DW ARD FlVECOATE 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
ll^tnrian 



Mr. I i om> Ki n h 



HONORARY NUMBERS 
Mr. H. F. Good 



Mr. R. L. Welch 






PHILIP OLS1 N 

iu K NOTEBAART 

LAUR1 \( I s.\L!i K 
i \RI PETERSON 
OLBERG HAGI N 



MEMBERS 

|AM1 s MAM I V 
WILLIAM WINGER 
\l. I. SHOGREN 

HAI \! RSON 
JOHN NOTHAM 



GEORGE SWANT 
ROLAND FRAZER 
REX ENGLESBY 
HAROLD SILVIUS 
MR H. I. Ml! M s 



Pag* ti 










>5 






Paz* 8) 






-- 





IPMOAATO 3C0WA!UZ 



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mttcc + £lUh 



The Science Club 



The purpose of the Science Club is to keep abreast with the scientific spirit of the 
time; to create an interest in the promotion of science; and to broaden our vision of the 
part science plays in a liberal education. 



Kathryn Col n m i i 
[RMGAARD Sc iiw , 

Mildred Dinc.i i 



OFFICERS 



Preside it i 

-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



DR. BACHMAN 
MISS CRUIS1 
Miss WALSH 
MISS MILLER 
MRS. LONG 
K ( OUNSELL 
I. SCHWARTZ 



MEMBERS 

l . PAGi 
H. RASMUSS1 \ 
H. FLAG] I 
M. DING! f 
R. DODGE 
H. KOSS 
lBER 
H NOVAK 



E. PATRICK 

M. NEERGAARD 

M. DcCRAMER 

M. HRYZ 

G. HANS! N 

< . NESS 

E. GIESE 



Pete S4 



Q 



29^ 



**■ 







Stout Band 



A 



T the beginning of the school-year, about thirty students joined this organization. 
No restrictions were made as to ability or experience. It was the purpose of 
the director to develop a band from the material available. 

The members have proved themselves loyal by putting other interfering en- 
gagements aside and attending rehearsals. The football and basket-ball seasons were 
made more peppy and more enjoyable, we hope, because the band was "on deck" and 
played at the games. Again the students showed their support and appreciation by 
taking the band to Eau Claire as a special pep feature. 

A number of concerts have been given in the assembly throughout the year. In 
this way the band gave the student body an idea of what it could do in a truly musical 
way. 

Practice in directing is a popular phase of the band's purpose, of which many of 
the Seniors take advantage because of its practical value. 



OFFICERS 



Charles Ingram am 
Ermeldo Cairelli 
Claire Knltson 
Kenneth Patterson 
Harold Tali .man - 
John Fa villi-, Jr. 



DitK tor 
Manager 

Assistant Manager 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Librarian 

Faculty Adviser 



1929 



Pat* \- 



Girls' Glee Club 



OFFICERS 






Jane Hambi i ■> 
Eleanor Overby 
Mildred Olson 
Anita Gl.ndi.acii 
Henrietta Sievert 
Kirnice Brick i-.r 
Miss Hilda Bali ki d 
III I ian Hylland 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

- Librarian 
Reporter 

Faculty Adviser 
companist 



PERSONNEL 



First Soprano 

H. SIEVERT 
OVERBY 
M. FUNK 
M. OLSON 
H. FLAGI T 
M. SIMONSON 
i . I ANION 



Second Soprano 

■ VATCHORM 

A. AND1 RSON 

B. BRICKER 
!. \l LSON 

I sOGGE 



Alto 

J. HAMBI FY 
H. RASMUSS1 N 
A. JON is 
M. NEERGAARD 
E. PAGE 
R. CREGO 
I. GILBERTSON 
MDLACH 




I ■,■■ --■ 



»NJ 





The Men's Glee Club 

THE Men's Glee Club aims to develop the general musical ability of its members 
through intensive study of both the classical and the lighter types of quartet 
work. Selections for membership arc made on a strictly competitive basis, at the 
beginning of each school year. Of late years, the organization has consisted of a 
chorus of sixteen voices. 

Appearances have been made, at different times, before assemblages of local business 
and religious organizations, and a fine concert was rendered at the close of the season's 
work. 

We are proud to say that the glee club is a growing organization, and is keeping 

step with other student activities. Each year an increased number of men have reported 

for trvputs. and the interest shown by the appointed members has been exceptionally 

ecn. 



PERSONNEL 



Mr. H. F. Good 
Harold TaUFMan 

first Tenor 

SAM .Will RsO\ 
SIDNEY COTTON 
LEON HAASE 
STEPHEN OELLERICH 

First Bj" 

JOHN BARBER 
GEORc.I BIVER 
CHARLES CHILDRESS 
WALTER THOMI 



Director 
Accompanist 

Second Tenor 

111 I ML' TH BRAMSTEDT 
NORMAN OLSON 
CHARLES RUN HOLD 
THEODORI WMWDIR 

Second Bass 

FERDINAND FRANZ 
CARL GALOFF 
ALBERT HANSON 
CLAIR] RNUTSON 






Pag* U 



*9 










Stout Rifle Club 

THE club was organized May I7, 1927, affiliated with the National Rifle Associa- 
tion, and held its first meeting for the school year 1928-29 soon after the open- 
ing of the first semester. The club, totaling thirty-four members, was divided 
into two teams, permitting every member to receive his full share of rifle shoot- 
ing under the guidance of a competent instructor. All phases of rifle practice and 
marksmanship are taught according to and in compliance with the rules and regulations 
given by the National Rifle Association. 

Competitive and prize shoots were held between the two teams, and with local 
rifle teams. 

Through the courtesy and co-operation of the local Company A officers, their splen- 
did outdoor range is used for target practice with high powered rifles. 



PRIZI WINNERS 



Class A 
Class B 
Class C 



J. Dodge 
H. Houle 
N. Peterson 



19. 



m. 




Women's Athletic Association 

The purpose of this organization is to stimulate athletic interest among the girls and 
to promote the general health of the girls by encouraging them to participate in sports. 



Fr.\\< is Yl KM KM 

Hi nrii tta Qlii.i in<. 
Franc is Im m i-ldt 
Marietta Di < ramef 



GEORGIA A HI K 
MARGARET \l l l \ 
1 1 OKI \c I BAH OCK 
I Dim HRI VIG 
HENRD I I A BRAKI K 
I HAR1 IM BAB1 I R 
MI R( I I >I S ( RANSTON 
WINIFRED COOP! K 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 

I AM I < I ARK 
\1ARI1 II A Dl ( K AMI R 
RUTH DODG1 
JOSEPHINI EDINGER 
MARY (.RUN 

1 K \\( IS Hill 

PRAN< is INENF1 : I 
ADI.I I. 1 AM KTON 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treast 



KL IM I INDALL 
ll \RI I [NDALL 
HI NRII I r A QUIL1 IN*. 
I vdia STTNDT 
wi.ol MOE 
FRAN( l s TADDY 
FRAN< Is Vl RKJERKJE 
A I MA W IV 






Page 90 







^js: 






Page 91 










S. M. A. 



OFFICERS 



Helen Louise Larson 
Aac.ot Moi 
Beulah Todd 
Jane Hambi.i i 
Miss Lillian Jeter 
Mrs. Gran\ is 






FLORENCE BAIU o< K 
Mil DRED HI I IN A 
HENRIETTA BRAKl K 
MARY FOX 
LUCILE HAGERTY 
I am HAMB1 I v 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

ADELE LA\< KTON 
HELEN L. LARSON 
SALLY MARTIN 
LUCILE MILER 
AAGOT MOE 
IRMA NICHOLS 



President 
Vice-President 

- Secretary 

Treasurer 

Vacuity Advisor 
Associate Adt iser 



EMMA SOGGE 
FRANCES TADDY 
BEULAH TODD 
DOROTHY WILLIAMS 
I I 1/ \BETH WILLIAMS 
FRANCES VERKI RK1 



11929 



Pag* ■/-• 



*3i 




S. M. A. Pledges 



1 AURA ANDREAS'* 
MYRTLE ANDERSON 
HELEN ( HAMBERLAIN 
|AN] T CLARK 
NELLIE GEIGER 
MARGUERITE HART 
I AM T KYLE 
PHYLLIS LINN 



CAROL McCLURG 
ELLEN Mil I I K 
MARJORIE NICHOLS 
RUTH OLESON 
BLANCHE SALVERSON 
LYDIA STINK I 
VALERIA YOLP 
FLORENCE WILSON 







1929 






Page os 



Philomathean Literary Society 

The Philomathean Literary Society was organized for the purpose of furthering gen- 
eral culture. The work this year has varied somewhat from previous activities. The 
girls decided that they would like to take up the study of current art and literature, 
and the Outline of Art by Sir William Orpcn. Good scholarship and high ideals are 
required of its members. 

OFFICERS 



Irmgard Schwartz 

Edith Brevic .... 

Ruby Eckmax 

Elva Page .... 

Miss Miller .... 

Mrs. Pall \\ ii SON 

MEMBERS 

EDITH BREVIG 
RUBY ECKMAN 
A I ICE HASLERUD 
|1 ANNETTE JACKSON 

\ok NELSON 
ELVA PAG1 

IRMGARD SCHWARTZ 
HII I N STETZER 
CHARLOTTE waTCHORX 
ALMA WIN/IK 
RUTH BOSSLI \l R 



President 

Vice-President 
Secretary 

Treasurer 
Faculty Ad i isor 
Associate Ad: 



RUTH MALCOl \I 
LOIS BUNK! R 
\I Id COCKERILL 
DOROTHY COLE 
HAZEL FLAGET 
MILDRED HAGGARD 
GERTRUDE HANSON 
VIVIAN HI WITT 
CLARISM M ss 
III I EN NOVAK 
MARY OHARA 



MARGARET AI I EN 
MIIDRID DINGEE 



PLEDGES 



MAGAR1 II viahl 
Fl RN wi-NDT 



i 







rage 94 









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**■ 



The Hyperian Society 



THE Hyperian Society, .in a social service organization, aims to study some of the 
ill welfare problems and to participate, when possible, in local projects of 
that nature. 

Among the projects sponsored during the past year are a Christmas party 
for needy children, story hours at the Memorial Library, and the maintenance, in part, 
of a twenty months old "son." 

This year a news letter sent to all alumni acquainted them with the work and 
accomplishments of the society. 



OFFIC! 1<S 
Helen Roth 

ESTHl R («K1 N/OW 
W'l.MI Kl I) C.OOIM K 

Audi i i \ A\i>i kson 

\ \ I II \1 I\ V \s<)! I>-I Al I MR 

Mrs. w . B. Davison 



President 
Vice-President 

S clar) 
Treasurer 

Ad: 

Usociate Ad\ 



HELEN ROTH 
HENRIETTA SEIVERT 
ELDRID WIK1 
MARIE SIMONSON 
ETHEL PATRICK 
1 I l ANOR OVERBY 
HI NRIETTA QUILI INc 
PEARL LINDALL 
RUTH LINDALL 
Al l( I MARQUART 



MEMBERS 

WINIFRED ARNOLD 
ARD1 I I A AND! RSON 
Ml !<( 1 1)1 s < RAN VI ON 
HELEN BUNKER 
VC'INIFKI 1) COOPI R 
ni I da DAMROW 
anna DcYOUNG 
ELIZABETH DOOLEY 
MARY GRE1 N 
ESTHER (.RINZOW 



JOSEPH IN r I DIM. I R 
ANITA GUNDLA< II 
IRMA (.11 HI RISON 
I \l\l\ HANS! N 
LILLIAN HYLLAND 
KATHRYN COUNSELL 
FRAN< is INI Nil I Dl 
BETH MURRAY 
BLENDA NM SON 
VIOLET IRK KSON 



•». •*. mens ■ 

, UABNWfiiMX INC0S7RY H2NU* I 




Page 96 



1 1 






HYPERIAN 





































Areme 

The Arcmc Society is open only to students and faculty who arc members of the 
Order of Eastern Star. Its main objective is to further the social relationship between 
the members and maintain a love interest in the lodge. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 

Kathleen Shannon .... 

Mable Neergaaro .... 

Vivian Hum 

Francfs [nenfeldi - 

Miss Buchanan - 

Mks. J. B. Steves ..... 



Alva Ades 
Evelyn Anderson 
Georgia Ablr 
Bernice Bru m r 

Elaini (\\ll I ON 
El DR1 !> W IK 1 



- President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

faculty Ad\ 
Assot iate .\Ji isor 



Isabel Ekman 
Ri b\ Ekman 
\i i \ Jones 
Pats\ Ruth Kelly 

Phi i i is I in\ 






Pag* pi 




The Trowel 

THE Trowel is composed of faculty and student members of The Stout Institute 
who are affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 
The purposes of the club arc: to promote the common interests of the mem- 
bers; to create a spirit of friendship among the men, providing them with a 
means of becoming better acquainted with one another; and to promote the social and 
other activities of the school. 

Meetings are held twice a month with occasional social activities promoted bv the 
club. 



OFFICERS 



Charles Strong 
W v. Winger 
E. C. Harti.r 
H. F. Good 



President 

Vice-President 
tary-Trea 
Faculty Adx 



MEMBERS 



SAM AND! RSON 
OTTO ANDERSON 

ROY BAR I HOI Ml V 
MAURICE BI.OMII I Y 
or! i V DUFFIN 
HARRY F RINGER 
VICTOR GLENN 



STEPHEN OELLERICH 
CLIFFORD PETERSON- 
WARD SMITH 
MELKER SHOGREX 
ROGER TASKER 
FRI'D SHORT 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

II. \X. DIXOX G. IVERSOX 



II92S 



Page 99 







Tainter Annex 








OFFICERS 




Pearj Lindall 


. 


President 


Winifred 


Cooper 


- 


Vice-President 


Eleanor Ovi risi 





Secretary 


JOSI PHIN1 


Edinger - - - - 


Treasurer 


Georgia Abi r 


- 


House Inspector 






MEMBERS 




HEI.GA RASMUSSEN 




VIOLET 1 RICKSON 


VIRGINIA ROW] 


GEORGIA ABER 




JOSI- PHI xi EDINGER 


BLANCH! SALVERSON 


ARDELLA ANDERSON 




HENRIETTA SIEVERT 


LAURETTA SCHMIDT 


WINIIRI 1) ARNOLD 




PATSY RUTH KELLY 


c AROl SffiBl RNS 


CHARLINE BABLF.R 




PEAR1 LINDALL 


\.\ \ VAN HOUTEN 


MILDRED BE1 INA 




RUTH LINDALL 


FRANC is VERKERKE 


RUTH BOSSL'FXER 




1 L'C 11 1 Mil 1 R 


LEOl A VR1 I l AND 


EDITH BREVIG 




ELLEN MILLER 


c HARLOTTE WAT< HORN 


BERNICE BRK M R 




BETH MURRAY 


ALMA WINZI R 


ELAINE CAN I HON 




MABL1 NEERGAARD 


ELIZABETH DOOLEY 


Al !( 1 ( cK M RII I 




CLARY si NESS 


Vivian HEWITT 


DOROTHY (OLE 




RUTH 01 ESON 


ivirnia PORSLUND 



WINIKRI D COOPER 
KATHRYN ( 0UNS1 I I 
MARION CRESS 
NI 1 DA DAMROW 
MARIETTA 1)1 c RAMER 



SHIRELY I. OI son 

A! K I OSTRUM 

l 1 ! ANOR OVI RBY 

I LVA PA< 

MARGARI I IOHNSON 



KATHIRINI GRASI II 
MILDRED HAGGARD 
MARGUERITE HART 

IS IIIII 

LOUISE HOBART 



■ c* 




Tainter Annex 

Rose and amber was the sunset on the lake. 
Rcd-rosc the hills; 

High upon their brows, the black tree-branches 
Spread wide across the evening sky. 

LOCATED high above the shores of Lake Menomin and surrounded by cowering 
pine-trees, Tainter Annex is a most attractive college home. Main times in the 
evening the i'irls gather in groups about the grounds, or within the hall in the spacious 
living-room. There, before the great fireplace, "the home fire's the happy fire." and 
the room is a lovely place. 

During the past year many social affairs hive been held. Open House at Home- 
coming time brought alumni, faculty, students, and parents. Cancelling the traditional 
feud between Sophomores and Freshmen, the Sophomores entertained the lower cliss- 
wemen. and were entertained in turn by them. At holiday time, the girls sang Christ- 
mas carols, enjoyed a party, and were visited by a real Santa Claus; at Easter time, they 
entertained friends. The girls who live at the Annex will ever have happy memories of 
their '•cars in the home on the brow of the h : ll. 
















Back row; M. Hjrrt, A. Ha«lerud, M. Dingec, l, Johnston, Mr*, Dow, H. Flaget 

Second row: L Knutson, Y. Hunaiker, A, hfarquart, \l. Caaay, M. Allen, <".. ffanacn, K. Shannon. 

Fronl row: II Koaa, F. Schroedcr, I*. Babr, L Hanaen, A. Gvndlarb, 1". Taddy, C. Bride, 



Tainter Hall 

Bertha Taintcr Hall, once the resident home of an old family prominent during 
the pioneer days, is the oldest of the three dormitories for students of Home Economics 
at Stout. The hall accommodates about thirty girls, only members of the upper classes 
being admitted. 



Lt>w\wryou. iNcusr«Y hcndhI 




I'age loi 



i 1929 




Lynwood Hall 

The House of Jollity ami I'mi 

HERE'S to ourselves — the 192S-29 group, who have played and worked together. 
The year is gone: most of it will always be bright in memory — the special par- 
ties, the "At Home" after the Homecoming football game when there were hot 
coffee and doughnuts for all the Stoutites; the Thanksgiving tables with all that 
was beautiful, delicious, and funny; the reception to facult) and others when the mer- 
cury was almost lost at 30 degrees below; then the jolly St. Patrick's party when 
wood was suddenly turned into a men's dormitory with Pats everywhere in green 
and black trousers, dancing with the pretty colleens, our guests; the picnic with whole- 
some fun and good cats at Galloway Cre.k; and let's not forget the P. J. birthday 
celebrations in the basement. Lynwood may have happy groups in the future years, but 
we doubt if there can be a happier one than the 1 928-_ 



OFFICERS 



Ruby Ekm w 
Sally Martin- 
Ruth Malcoi m 
i i !\ Cadig w 
Ruby Starr 
Dr. Ba< h\i w 



Head !'■ 
Associate Proctor 

- Secretary 

Treasurer 

House Inspector 

Ex-Officio 










Pitt n$ 



I 



Y. W. C. A. 



The three-fold purpose of our organization is as follows: 

1. We unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing knowl- 
edge of God. 

2. \\"e determine to have a part in making this life possible for all people. 
5. In this task we seek to understand Jesus and follow Him. 



Ol I |( IRS 

/'r, 

P ..lent and Chairman of Memi ommittet 

Secretary 

Chairman Bihle Study Committee 

- Chairman Finance Committee 

Chairman World Fellowship Committee 

- Chairman Social Committee 

• Chairman Religious Meetings 

Chairman Publicity Comm 

Chairman Social Service Committee 

FACULTY ADVlsl Ks 

President 
Vict President 

Bihle Study Commit! 

Finance Committee 
- World Fellou -hip Committee 
../ Committee 
Religious Meetings Com mi; 

Publicity Committee 
Social Sen ice Commit 



\ AND] RSON 

Hi NKII I I \ SlI VI RT 

Gra< e Linderson 
Helen Bunker 
Ethel Patrk k 
Audi i i \ Andi rson 

WlNII Rl I) COOPI K 
Al I< I 1 1 \M l RUD 
KaTHRYN Col Nsl 1 I 

Anita Gundlach 

Hi nru i i \ Ql ii i i\<. 



Miss Mi< haels 

Miss McCALMONT 
Miss FROCCATT 
Miss CARSOM 
Dr. B\< I I MANN 
Miss Mil II R 

Miss BaJ 1 RUD 
Miss Bu< iivnan 
Mks. I Al TNI R 



II - 



Fage io6 




Page tOJ 







Stout Y. M. C. A. 



THE Y. M. C. A. stands on the campus as a central religious organization in which 
Stout men of all denominations are afforded an opportunity to express their ideals. 
It aims to promote a moral and religious college spirit besides providing student 
help to those in need. 
Regular meetings are held on alternate Wednesday evenings. These meetings feature 
discussions on campus problems, talks by students and outside speakers, mm.\ other in- 
teresting programs. 



ADVISORY BOARD 



Mr. C. A. Bow man 
Mr. H. F. Good 



Mr. II. C Mm ms 

Mr. R. F. Kkan/i s< h 






Ri v. W'.vn rs 



OFFICERS 



Norman Pi iirson 
Gordon Johnson 

I li sin Ki NNON 



President 
\'/< e-President 
tary -Treasurer 













The Marquette-La Salle Club 






THE Marquette-La Salle Club is the Catholic young women's and young men's 
club of The Stout Institute. At present, the enrollment is about thirty. 
The purposes of the club are: to promote common interests of the Catholic 
young women and men at Stout; to create a feeling of fellowship and co-opcr.i- 
tion among these students by affording them a means of becoming better acquainted with 
one another; to inspire confidence and self-reliance when in the presence of others, by 
means of parliamentary practice and other activities; to co-operate with other organiza- 
tions of the school in social and other affairs; and to serve as an agent in the develop- 
ment and perpetuation of high moral character. 



OH ICERS 






robi ki th1 ii 1 k 
Mildred Bllina 
Cecilia Cadigan 
William Soucie 



- President 
Vice-President 

- Secretary 
Treasurer 












? > * $ ? 



rvi 



The Stout Lutheran Student Association 



The purpose of the Stout Lutheran Student Association is to promote the interest 
of the Lutheran students at Stout. It relates to the program of the Lutheran Church 
at large, and presents in all legitimate ways to Stout students the various needs of the 
Lutheran Church, especially in the field of leadership and personnel. 

Meetings are held the third Wednesday night of each month. There have been 
fifty active members of the association this year. 



OFFICERS 



Rlth Lindall 
Margaret Johnson 
John Rude 
Miss Bai bruo - 
Miss Froggatt 



- President 
Secretary 

Treasurer 
Vacuity Ait her 
Vacuity ,\di iser 



L 



Pane no 



3/929 



*a« 



Finite and Infinite 

God sets no stakes to say, "Here is an end," 

Xor seeks to lay a chain from orb to orb, 

Xor plats the awful voids that stretch between 

Some far-flung stellar system and our own. 

To God both Time and Distance arc as one. 

And lifetimes tiny beads that hang as strands 

Which men denote an epoch or an age. 

But vaunting man, who ever blindly seeks 

To make of God an image of himself, — 

Thinks of all creatures he's the Lord's elect 

'Tis only he makes much ado of ends. 

And were God man how once He would have laughed 

When His vain bipeds solemnly declared 

That without doubt the great, round Earth is flat! 

— W. B. D. 




29 



Pagt tit 









September Sail 



The lake is cold in September, 

But boating's worth the effort . 

One day. Hank and I sailed up the lake 

Head on with a strong west wind; 

And built a fire by the shore 

To cook some supper. 

We put the sail to windward 

To halt -way shed the breeze, 

And I wrecked eggs on bread 

And flopped 'em with the pan. 

To her surprise and admiration too; — 

She's got a lot to learn about outdoors. 

But I started out to tell 

The beauty of a fall fringed lake. 

When a fellow appreciates a sun 

That doesn't burn at all; 

And the water slaps the boat 

With a jingle near like ice. 

It's God's lake. 

He lets the lovers boat there in the spring. 

The lazy ones to loaf in summer. 

But He lets us use it in the fall 

Who love it most and know its w.i 

In the last of September. 

I admit it. gladly. 

I shivered in the wind behind the sail. 

And Hank crawled deeper in the blankets. 

Coming back I had to paddle all the way; 

I did put my sweater on the thwart. 

But work was all that made me warm. 

There's something about a cold moon 

That makes a finer sheen 

Than summer ever casts; 

And fools me when the weed bed 

Takes flight across the water 

And mud hens haste away. 

Yes, I like the lake in summer. 
In spring, and winter too. 
But a fall day's the time 
For lovers of the great outdoors; 
When wild birds migrate 
And appetite is at its best. 






— D. W. H. 



Pate iu 










it 



, 



,J&%. K 



5ttctalworKina 



True education trains the mind, dei clops the Ifody. and enriches the spirit. T/x 
true value of competitive athletics h often underestimated, for good iportsmansbip 

is among the most noble of human attributes. 



/-> 




I MIL RAH J A 



Emil Rajah was a student at The Stout In- 
stitute during the years 192 5 and 1926. He was 
an unusually competent scholar and was active 
in inter-collegiate athletics. While participating 
in a football game, Rajah sustained injuries 
which have been the indirect cause of much 
suffering. He is, at the present time, residing at 
Chisholm, Minnesota, where he is convalescing. 

Alumni, faculty, and students are banking 
on Emil's recovery, and are awaiting the day 
when he will again be seen on the Stout campus. 



Page 114 



S. E. PAULUS 

Coach S. L. Paulus is one of the finest 
coaches of the conference. He knows how to 
handle men well and is very consistent in what- 
ever he undertakes to do. Good sportsmanship 
is one of his standards in athletics, and whether 
the team wins or loses, we can always depend 
upon witnessing a good battle. 




DIRECTOR ;>! ATHLETICS 
// j./ Foo/MI < 




M. W. VAX PUTTEN 

Coach Van Putten has worked with Coach 

Paulus before coming to Stout this year and has 

-,l\\ the reputation of being a good coach. He is 

always a hard worker; this institution may be glad 

to have as fine a man as Bill Van Putten. 



HEAD BAski TBALL COACH 
lull Coach 



:, 31<- .'< 



1929 Football Season 




CAPTAIN MARTY OPI.M 



During the past two years Captain Marty Opem was a mainstay of Stout's foot- 
ball team. He always fought a game battle until the last whistle was blown. 

Marty did his best to help bring about a winning football team, but handi- 
capped by new material and injuries throughout the season, the team was as suc- 
cessful as could be expected. 



Fog* :j6 




< API.MN-I l.l-CT MA< MORRISON 



ST. PAUL LUTHER COLLEGE HERE 



The first game of the season was played with St. Paul Luther College. The 
Trainers had little difficulty in defeating the St. Paul eleven. Score, 25-0, in favor 
of Stout. In this game, the coaches gave the majority of the boys a chance to show 
their stuff. Captain Opem, Decker, and Paciotti were the mainstays of Stout. 





V DE< kl R 



IOM 







KOKOMO HARRIS 



( HIT I'.ROW \ 



LA CROSSE AT MENOMONIE 

The next game was played with the last year's champions, La Crosse, which 
turned out to be a tie, 6-6, both reams scoring on breaks. The teams were evenly 
matched and both played very good football. While Stout was weak in the first 
half, the men came back in the second period and showed their superior strength 
over the Physical Ed boys of La Crosse. 

FORT SNELLING THERE 

Due to Stout's injuries and new material, the Soldiers gave the Trainers their 
first defeat of the year, the score being 15-7. In this second non-con ference game, 
the coaches gave all the reserves an opportunity to display their football ability. 




HOME* OMING GAM! 



Page lit 




IOHNNIE k 

RUSTY WAI I IN 



RIVI-.R 1 ALLS HERE 



Stout's old rival, River Falls, came to Mcnomonic with the reputation of a 
smooth and powerful eleven. The Trainers outplayed the visitors during the first 
half, leaving the score 0-0. Both teams came back in the second half determined 
to score. The Falls, aided by their plunging fullback, Clafflin, succeeded in defeat- 
ing Stout 12-0. 

Decker, Notebaart, and Paciotti were the outstanding players of the Stout 
team. 




VERT REEDER 

SID HEATH 



I'atf it9 



STEVENS POINT HERE 



Homecoming was a huge success, but it was 
darkened a bit by the Stevens Point victory of 
2 5 -7. Main of Stout's old gridiron players 
were back to cheer for their Alma Mater. The 
boys fought courageously to fulfill the hopes of 
all the alumni and students who were cheering 
for a win. but the Pointers, having a more ex- 
perienced and a heavier team, outclassed our 
boys. The Trainers seemed unable to get their 
bearing, and when the half ended, they were on 
the short end of a 19-0 score. 

At the beginning of the second half, Stout 
seemed to break loose and gained constantly. 




JA< K NOTKBAART 




scoring a touchdown when Schwartz threw 
a beautiful pass to Greeley, who, with the 
aid of good interference, went over for 
Stout's only tally. Paciotti kicked goal. 

Greeley, Opem. Xotcbaart, Olson, 
Paciotti, Decker, and Harris played their 
last game on the home grounds. 

Paciotti's work at tackle during this 
game did much to place the only Stout 
man on the all conference team picked by 
the coaches. 



\ciotti 

■ liferent,- Tackle 



Page m 




HI \ sc HVC'ARTZ 



AT SUPERIOR 



Superior's powerful team came into scoring action and defeated us by a score of 
70-12. None of Stout's plays seemed to work except the passing combinations in 
which Notebaart showed his keen ability to catch passes. 








If PAULUS 




















A 



At Eau Claire 

r LIFE'S darkest moment, Stout turned what looked like a sure defeat into 
sudden victory over Eau Claire, 14-13, in Eau Claire's Homecoming game. 

During the first period there was an exchange of punts, and neither team 
scored. 

Eau Claire opened the second quarter with a short drive which was halted when 
they fumbled on Stout's 56 yard line. Stout began a march with runs by Opem and 
Decker. With the ball in the shadow of their own goal posts, Eau Claire held for 
three downs, but on the fourth play Marty threw a perfect pass to Notcbaart who 
went over for a touchdown. Paciotti place-kicked for the extra point. 

Eau Claire scored soon after the second half started, when they blocked Stout's 
punt; however, they did not duplicate the extra point. 

Early in the fourth quarter, Eau Claire scored an additional touchdown by 
means of a sweeping end run. They kicked goal, making the score 13-7. Only two 
minutes remained of the final quarter when Bennie Schwartz threw a nice pass to 
Lu Paulus, who raced within 15 yards of the Eau Claire goal line. Marty made 
three yards through tackle; Decker smashed through the line for the remaining 
twelve yards, scored a touchdown, and tied the score. Everyone prayed that Pash 
would come through with one of his kicks; he kicked a perfect goal, which pushed 
the score up to 14-13 in favor of Stout. 



Page lit. 




Top row: Kern, I n. Rude. Notcbasrt. 

Third row: Heath. Reeder. Muller. Morrison, K:. 

Second row: Paciotii. Brown. Coach Paulus .Wt Coach Van Puttcn. Pauluv Wallin. 
row: S:i:J. M>;r. Johmon, Fra*er, Capt. Opcin. Decker, As*"t. Stud. Mgr. 



At Whitewater 

In the last game of the season, Whitewater seemed to be better trained in ma- 
neuvers of navigation than our boys. They evidently were used to playing in a sea 
of mud and water, because they had all the necessary equipment to bring their fleet 
through to an overwhelming victory. The last game of the season ended with 
Whitewater at the long end of a 40-0 score. 




rage m 




Our Cheer Leaders 

WITH Toby Emerson as Rooter King, and with Al Poellinger and Bill Gard- 
iner as his right-hand men, marked improvement in Stout's cheering has been 
apparent. A yell is a yell with most people, but when' this trio steps before 
a cheering section, a yell becomes an inspiration. Whether we have won or lost, these 
boys have put PEP into the crowd, and the bleachers still seem to be echoing back 
our "Fight, Stout, Fight." 

Toby has put his heart into his task, and has done his best to organize and train 
his men; Bill Gardiner, a member of last year's team, has lost most of his former 
bashfulness, but still retains his contagious grin; and Al Poellinger's smiling counte- 
nance and ready wit always have seemed consistent with the spirit of a successful 
pep assembly. 

We feel that the students have responded enthusiastically to all calls for pep 
demonstrations, which fact itself speaks well for the personnel of Stout's cheer lead- 
ing team. They're a peppy bunch and we're proud of them. 




. 










Basket-ball 



J 



CAPTAIN ROLLIE DECKER 

V. team ever had a leader who set a more 
pace than Decker did during this bas- 
ket-ball season. For three years Rol was a 
mainstay of Stout's basket-ball team. V 
matter whether his team was winning or los- 
ing, his consistent fighting spirit carried the 
morale to his team-mates. 

Decker deserves great credit for the time 
and effort put forth in helping to bring Stout's 
athletics up with the rest of the conference. 




BUCK SCHAl 
For two years Buck has been on the 
vanity. He if small but outpace* his 
opponent* on the floor. He came 
through when called upon to do a 
pinch-hitter's duty. ll» service CO 
the squad hat been of great value. 



JOHNNU RUDE 

John was a utility man who saw 
actsor. • the conference games. 

He all in every position and 

handled himself well. As this was 
his first season, he will be on deck 
next year. 



Mr. - ;ros 

Becoming a regular as the season 
progrt played the 

center position for the last eight 
games. H CO OUC-jwnp his 

opponents and to play the forward 
/one earned him this position. Vi'e 
look forward to seeing Stike strut his 
stuff in the next two years. 



Pete tis 



<K> ' 






I II IV HANS 
Lefty played >eck in Seoul's defease. 

Playing hi :• ball, h: came 

through beautifully. He is a fast and 
guard and during the past sea^.: 
broke through the defense to CO 
He will be another veteran back next year. 





DAN i\ 

Afl .'an at guard and center. Coach 

Van Puttcn decided Dan w i this 

red the last three game*. Dm 

:akc the boys out of their sh. 

slump. Me did his share to contribute to the 
score board. 




JAY PR] 
Coming back CO Stout after previous 
experience on a Trainer squad, 
again filled in when called upon in the 
1929 season. Although only entering 
a few games, he was a faithful worker 
throughout the season. 



BUD MM 
Al the ^eason progressed. Bud, an- 
other frosh. was used regularly at a 
forward position because of his clever 
floor work and endurance. His all- 
around playing overshadow 
ability to find the basket. 



LU PAl 

Paulus started the basket-ball u 
with consistent basket shootin-; but 
fell into a slump. Lu, however, played 
effectively in all but one conference 
game. 1 1c could be depended upon 
when called into action at the 
crucial moment. 



I'agt u6 




, Cvcngro*. Mich) 
Back row: Coach \ "j:i Puccen, Paulus, Evans, Rude. : Paulas, Mft. Gillct. 



1929 Basket-Ball Season 

THE 1929 Basket-ball season once more proved the old basket-ball maxim that 
the team that throws the ball through the hoop the most times wins. Had the 

number of shots counted, our Blue Devils would have been right up there with 
the conference leaders, but inability to "connect" kept us out of the race. 

Coach Van Putten worked up a nice combination that could take the bail 
through for shots which, if made, would have put several lost games in the win col- 
umn. The fact that there were two freshmen on the varsity and that, with the ex- 
ception of Decker and Schaude, it was the first year of varsity competition for 
every member of the squad may have been the reason for the luckless shooting. An 
ounce of luck would have put over several close games for us. 



Pate t.v 




•eh Pau!u\. Harmon, Haaie, »ch Van Puiicn. 

Back rowj .ibot. Hanson. Biwcr, Fordnam. 



At Eau Claire 

THE final game of the season was played at home against our traditional rivals 
from Eau Claire. It was a nip and tuck game throughout. With three min- 
utes to go, three of our regulars were on the sidelines, having come there via 
the personal foul route. Our one point had didn't look big enough, but a clever 
stall which gave us a final basket won the game, 24-21. It was a fine finish of a 
hard season during which our team fought throughout. 




Page IJX 



features 



Ol)e Sunn? 
Side 

(Tommunit? 
Tife 




Skill 



Skill is the result of native capacity developed through patient practice; witljout 
skill, all that our civilization prizes would be but a conglomerate mass. Artful touch 
and fine tec/unique are the genii who put a polish on this rough and formless world. 




"ftelafe^rt 



Can you revel in the /></</.- Can you appreciate the present} Can you antic- 
ipate the future? — Well, come with us; we'll sketch them for you. 



imZK-CLASS 



^ 



s 





INTEftBOWHOUSE 




-#SHt 




8/i JKETW& 







rBPON-ff/v. 




LK-KGR. 



&UXET b^ vV 



iStfWUWa 



/^7Zi£Y BA!lL 




Pa** /jo 



^mm^^m 



*52 






INTER-CLAS5 




9*5/ 








kMNDf 




4/ Uf£T&M> 



o 




m%* 



INTER-PORMITORY 







tf.&RAK ; 'r- 




^JAETt>^ vV 



SWIMMING 



FLA6HBALL 




/*<«** «» 




Stout. Here W'Y Come 



September 



9. Early arrivals look over the campus. 

10. General reunion and registration. 

11. Classes meet. We discover that we 

can no longer spot the Frosh a 
block away by their unfaded uni- 
forms. 

12. Gridiron oiled up for the season. 

13. Y. W. C. A. little sister party. 

14. Churches of Menomonie give social 

receptions for students. 

1 $. S. S. A. matinee hop for all students. 

16. Our first Sunday. We discover 
that Nick has made slight altera- 
tions in the Marion. 

I j. Miss Halscth leaves for Mexico to 
make her home. 



19. 



20. 



21. 



22. 



Julian Johnson elected head of the 

S. S. A. 
Classes held elections. Bud seems to 

be the I'rosh favorite. 
S. M. A.\ entertained at a dance in 

the gym. 
We won our first football game 

against Luther. 
24-25. Mcdic.il examinations under way. 

Stampede to sec the campus doc- 
tor. 
26. Classes of 192--28 leave plant vases 

as memorial. 
Manual Arts Players fill their quota 

of members. 
We enjoy the first issue of the 

Stoutonia. La Crosse meets us 

here in our first conference game. 



-"• 



28. 



Autographs 



1929 



Pant i & 






** 




Fight, Stout, Fight ! 



October 

5. Men's Glee Club entertained a large 

crowd at a mixer dance. 

6. We played Fort Snclling there. 

8. The Sophs again made use of the 

water tank at the other end of 20. 

town. Said feature was enjoyed 
by everyone — so the Frosh said. 

9. Tower began struggle with senior 

pictures. Juniors are almost as 
bashful. 

10. Frosh take the offensive and the 

green banner floats from the 
Tower all night. Some of us 21. 

wondered why Harmon chose to 
serenade that part of town. 

11. Our first Lyceum number, Harry 

Farbman. violinist, and Clara 
Scheville. contralto, was well at- 22. 

tended. 

12. Enthusiasm ran high at the River 

Falls game, although the final 25. 

score was somewhat in favor of 

the Falls. S. T. S. held another 

of their peppy initiations. 26. 

18. Sophs established supremacy in the 

second bag rush. 27. 

19. First alums appear on the campus. 

School adjourned and we got 28. 

ing in the history of Stout. The 

M. A. P. play was the opening 29. 

nt, followed by the traditional 
ready for the biggest Homeoom- 



pajama parade, bonfire, and Frosh- 
Soph conciliation. It was great 
to have Reppy and Xorris back 
to lead us in a couple of cheers. 

The big day! The student body 
was full of pep at the game after 
the big parade, and enthusiasm 
ran high. Lynwood entertained 
at "Open House.* 1 Les Loomcr, 
elected head of the first 
S. club. Banquet and dance com- 
pleted festivities for Saturday. 

The dorms entertained at "Open 
House." Departing alums agreed 
with us that this was the most 
successful Homecoming in the 
history of Stout. 

Monday; we were forced to con- 
vince ourselves that Homecoming 
was already in the past. 

Superintendent Ballentine advises: 
"Stretch out thy hand and lay 
hold of its tail.'* 

Societies issued first rushing invita- 
tions to "women only." 

Superior defeated us on her home 
territory. 

The Philomatheans entertained at a 
Fireside hour. 

S. M. A.'s feature a Hallowe'en 
party for rushees. 



i 1929\ 



Pat' W 




Page i>4 



■^ 




Remember the Tacky Drag 



Novembei 



1. Miss Walsh spoke to the Assembly 

on "Three One Day Trips 
Abroad." The Inky Fingers 

greeted their new members in the 

Band Box 

2. M. A. P.'s entertained at a dance in 

the gym. Remember? You 
brought lunch! 

3. We defeated Eau Claire there by a 

score of 14-13. This was oik- ot 
the peppiest games <>t the season. 

4. Societies held acceptance teas for 

pledges. 

5. Something new! The library open 

in the evening for the first time. 

6. Election day. Straw vote ot as- 

sembly was not confirmed. 
8. We all turned out to see the an- 
nual hobo football game. A Un- 
fortunates left for Madison 
Homecoming. 



11. 



16. 



24. 



--• 

29. 

30. 



Armistice Day. A new quarter be- 
gan for I. E. students. 

Team got a big send-off for the 
Whitewater game. 

Wc heard the quality of the band 
in assembly. Those s.ix.iphones 
certainly were wonders; at least 
that is what some of us thought. 

Did we lose or make money on the 
Wisconsin-M i n n c s o t a game? 
Some of us bet feeds instead of 
the hard cash. 

Budding reporters held a Turkey 
dinner in the Band box. 

Thanksgiving. 

We all turned out in our best garb 
for the Annual Tacky Drag. 
Have a good time? Ask Sid. 



Autographs 



1929 



Page i& 



*3< 



=51 




2. 



6. 



8. 
12. 

15. 



Home to Mother and Dad 

December 



Some of us cleaned after the Tacky 
i >rag. 

Rather a drag in social activities. 
but dinner dates from the Wis- 
consin game were being slowly 
paid up. 

Miss Mm/ addressed assembly, tell- 
ing of some of her experiences 
abroad. 

A i erne sponsored a card party. 

M. A. P. group present the Christ- 
mas play. "The Prince Chap." 

Still bothered with the flu: so the 
Philo dance was canceled. 



14. 



15. 



17- 



21. 
23. 



President Nelson leaves on lecture 
tour in California. 

We play our fisrt basket-ball game 
with Hanson's. 

The "midnight oil*' w.is burned for 
the last time. No more study- 
ing this year. 

The Hyperians entertained at a 
Christmas party. 

Vacation at last! 

Orpha Stevens was married to 
Gerald I.und. 



Autographs 






1929 



PaZf i 




Pate tsS 




Page /» 




t. 



11. 



12. 

14. 



16. 



And that Mid-Year Frolic 



J 



"The melancholy days are here 
The saddest of the year. 
Vacation days arc over now 

So, at least, I hear." 
Classes resumed, but some of us 

were still vacationing mentally. 
We competed in our first confer- 
ence game with Superior here. 

Afterwards every one enjoyed the 

\\ . A. \. dance. 
The S. M. A. rummage sale. 
Tired after the first week of classes, 

\vc did our best to catch up on 

work. 
Benefit movie. "Street Angel,*' 

sponsored by the Hyperian. Phii- 

omathean, and S. M. A. societies. 

Mr. Thetis gave an illustrated talk 

on Alaska in Assembly. 



anuary 

18. 



The Glee Club entcrtuned at a 
dance in the gym with the assist- 
ance of the Live Wires. 

21. Mac Morrison was chosen grid cap- 
tain. 

22-24. We struggled with exams, didn't 

we. Ellen? 

26. Mr. Brown removed the snow — and 
himself, from the roof of his 
home. The three societies enter- 
tained at a mid-year formal, one 
of the loveliest of social functions. 

29. "The saddest words of tongue or 

pen: 
The term's begun, we're back again." 

30. Classes began, and this time in earn- 

est, if they didn't last September. 

31. President N'elson addres^d Avscmb- 

ly. Clarence Belk took the helm 
of the Senior ship of state. 



Autographs 

(j \ 

j£~fc* ^^ -*- " *-** 





JVC*<. ■ «,, ,^,gw*^^~* 




I LL/^CM^i^*^^ -<. 




■u 




Cold the Blast May Blow 



February 



1. We found that it was not uncom- 13. 

mon to see Georgia and Jo brav- 
ing the winter's blasts together. 

4. The Sophs defeated the Frosh in 

basket-ball. 16. 

5. Societies began their formal initia- 

tion. 18. 

6-7. The Tower benefit movie. "Some- 
One to l.Ol ( ." 
8. The gab event of th; season, the 19. 

M. A. P. costume ball. Also the 
Frosh strut their stuff with a ban- 22. 

quet and a day all their own. 

11. Hyperians held a cookie sale in the 23. 

corridor. 

12. We regret that Lincoln wasn't born 

on a holidav. 



Three hundred of us accompanied 

the Varsity to Eau Claire where 

wc succeeded in having a grand 

time. 
We met the famous red birds on 

home territory. 
Annex co-eds defeat Lynwood in 

basket-ball. Jo gave support 

from the side-lines. 
Still victorious, the Annexers defeat 

the Soph team by .» close score. 
Stevens Point played here. M. A. 

P. card party. 
The Inky lingers elect Law 

Schmidt. Ruling Pen. 



4 



Autographs 



\1929 



Page U' 




Page //.• 




Pat' it: 



«&a« 




i. 



4. 



6. 



9. 



14. 



15. 



16. 



From the Women's Swimming Meet 



1-- 



March 

Revenge is sweet. We defeat Eau 18. 

Claire in one of the best games of 

the season by a score of 24-21. 

lent Nelson returned from an 19. 

extensive trip in the East. 
The faculty give the Seniors a lew 

tips on basket-ball technique in 20. 

the armory. 21. 

Our third Lyceum number: 

Elizabeth Kerr and Lester Spring. 
S. M A. had a grand and glorious 23. 

sleigh-ride. 
Gilles, Lefty, Whiting, and Hawkes 

performed for us in assembly. 

We suggest that they go on the 26. 

road instead of out in the field. 
M. A. P. put on the snappy play. 

"Kempy." 27. 

Lynwood entertained all Stout girls 
at a St. Patrick's day party. 29. 

Despite the weather, there was 
plenty of green on the Stout 
campus. 



Campus 1/aak Waltoner's rush th? 
season slightly but declare the 
turn-out better than expected. 

M. A. P. presented the tournament 
plav of "A Vim and Two Candle - 

Y. W. C. A. cabinet election. 
We had our first student assembly. 

We didn't know we had so many 

undiscovered orators. 
M. A. P. play took second place in 

the state meet at Madison. The 

first De-Mola} semi-formal was a 

big success. 
The Sophs won the swimming meet. 

The water pageant was one of the 

best yet. 
We count the days, and the lucky 

ones leave for home. 
Vacation officially began at 4:45. 



Autographs 



19. 



Patt 144 






*S 







April 



i. 



4. 



s. 



6, 



11. 

12. 
13. 

14. 



Miss McCalmont misses Y. w. 

meeting. April I ; ool. 
Tower puts on Kollcch Night. For 

once, local merchants declared 

that they sold out their supply of 

peanuts. 
Girls' Glee Club concert at the Me- 
morial. 
S. S. A. dance and Aremc card 

party. 

Carroll College Glee Club at the 

Congregational Church. 
Van has spring fever, plays hookey, 

and goes to Madison. 
Men's Glee Club. 
Y. W. C. A. retreat and dinner, 
lake Menomin at last into its own, 

and claims a goodly number of 

canoeists. 



16. 



19. 



20. 



22. 

24. 

26. 
29. 
30. 



Y.i going to the Prom? Whadda 
y.i goin* to wear? 

Dr. Bachman cuts assembly to 
count petri dishes. 

Fair co-eds arc busy breaking in new- 
pumps. 

The third annual Junior Prom was 
led by Gould Morrison and Gcr- 
aldinc Anderson. 

Lyceum: Tony S.irg's Marionettes. 

The Frosh display some real talent 
in their short stories. 

No doubt you all know that school 
closes in M.i\ tins jrear! 

The chemistry labs claim their quo- 
ta of struggling chemists. 

Anyway, we upper classman cm 
wish them luck in their unknowns. 
We know they need it. 



/ 



Autographs 



1929 



I'aer I4S 




Page Ij6 




Good B)c and Good Link 



May 



3. 



4. 



s. 



9. 



23. 



The May Basket Follies hit the spot; 
long live the spirit of appropriate, 
well-timed hilarity. 24. 

A charming luncheon was given by 
the Home Economics Faculty in 
honor of the Senior Women. We 
.ire finally constrained to believe 
that teachers are not so bad after 25. 

all. 

The last Stout Student Associa- 
tion Dance proved to be a decid- 26. 
ed success. 

The 1929 harvest of May flowers is 2j. 

in full swing; we notice, however, 
that no one is seen on a flower- 
picking expedition unaccompan- 28. 
ied. 

Mike is glad to have his canoes in 29. 

use again; his fortune would be 
a certainty were every afternoon 
of a Sunday. 

Athletic awards were issued in as- 30. 

scmbly; Johnnie Rude said that 
the occasion was the nearest thing 
to pay day that he had had for a 
long time. 



Oho! those exams; if Mother 
could only see me now. 

Remember if we have er'red in 

writing this, the month of May. 
we are none the less faithful; 
however, we may be poor proph- 
ets. 

The Seniors had their last get-to- 
gether dinner as students of The 
Stout Institute. 

Baccalaureate services were held in 
The Stoat Auditorium. 

This was Class Day. President and 
M:s. Bi rton E. Nelson gave a re- 
ception for all Seniors. 

The Senior Class Play was attended 
by a record crowd. 

This our Commencement day; good 
bye and good luck. Thank you 
very much. Mr. Cooper, for \<>ur 
excellent address. 

Stout, another year has passed. We. 
the students, allow you two weeks 
of rest until the 1V29 Summer 
Sosion. 



Autographs 



3 1929 






*3I 






Puddles 

Oh the shadows, in the puddles, on the sidewalks, in the spring 

When the birds begin to sing, 
In .in early fog that hovers like a heavy living thing. 
They arc deep, dark shadows— still and silent, on the sidewalks, 

In the spring. 

W hen I waken in the morning to a day that's just begun. 

My senses arc surrounded with the essences of spring; 

I can touch it, breath it, hear it, as I yawn, and stretch to greet it, 

I can see it — 

In the shadows, in the puddles, on the sidewalks, in the spring. 

It sets my heart a-thumping for the privilege I bear. 

To start the day by walking, stopping, staring at the fathom 

Depth reflected. 
By the steady cold snow water; 
I'm exalted — 
By the shadows, in the puddles, on the side walks, in the spring. 

I con the clear sharp outline of an aged leafless oak. 

Lengthened in the depth of water to a mammoth tree of art. 

Lest I break the reverent silence. 

I stand breathless — 

By the shadows, in the puddles, on the sidewalks, in the spring. 

— Hinrittta Rrakcr 



^lJ9291 



Page /*> 



Music was prohibited within certain hours within the precincts of a certain college. 
But one student found the saxophone more interesting than his studies. Next day 
he received a note from a higher authority: "Much against my better judgment, 
and for purposes of discipline only, I am compelled to regard your saxophone playing 



as music. 



Doctor, I'm going to die. 
What makes you think so? 
My life-time pen just broke. 



Frosh 

Clerk 
Frosh 



She stood before him, her eyes afire. 
He seemed to quail before her ire. 
Coldly she spoke, without a quiver, 
"Take back vour heart, I ordered liver." 



"I want to buv some gloves." 
"Kid?" 

"I should s.iy not; I'm a college man now." 



Berger: "Where is your car?" 

Mott: "I turned it in as a payment on a turkey.' 



Chester B.: "How do you like my new shirt, after wearing it all day?' 
Clayt. H.: "Oh, it's all right, but the cuffs don't take ink very well.' 



Autographs 






Page 150 



i 



He: "That orchestra isn't very good, is it?" 

She: "It's having trouble keeping time with you." 



Frosh: "Who wrote the first short story?' 
Soph: "A Scotchman." 



Soph: "My dad sent me something to keep my bills down." 
Frosh: "That's fine. What is it?" 
Soph: "A paper weight." 



Roommate to new roommate: "Listen, what's yours is mine, and what's mine be- 
longs to me." 



Last night within my hand I held 

Another hand so s»cntly. 
Great joy within my being swelled, 

I held it most contcntly. 
I'd like to hold that hand each night 

And dream of wondrous places. 
For the hand I held with such delight 

Had just four natural aces. 



What's that Frosh mooning about? 

He's just making the character in his short story live. 



Take a tip from nature. Man's ears were not made to shut; his mouth was. 



There's music in the treble 

Music in the bass; 
There's music from the instrument and 

Music of the face; 

There's music of the church bell, 

Music of the choir. 
Music of the mandolin and 

Music of the lyre: 
Oh there's music of the dance halls and 

Music every place. 
In Africa and Hindustan, 

In city and in space, 
Music of the cat-gut string and 

Music of the wire, 
Some that holds you in its spell mu\ 

Some of which you tire, 
But the lover's music tops the best 

And sets the heart on fire. 



■n 



■S 1929 i 



Page 151 



IN* 






THE ODE TO GARBAGE 

One night when I was helping Ma with dishes, 

We'd finished all the china. 

And the kettles to come next 

Were sitting on the stove. 

One was filled with mellon rind 

Which I would empty by the shed. 

Where all the garbage meets its doom 

In sacred burial. 






I trod from off the back porch step: 
A hoe was lying in repose; 
As it my step was foreign then. 
The handle hit me in the nose. 
I stepped aside with much alarm. 
A barrow handle hit my arm. 
Another step aside within, 
I caught a pail square on the shin. 
One more hope to escape wreck 
As the clothes line caught me on the neck. 
I slipped in cringing from the line. 
And landed on the melon rind. 
I won't tell now quite what I said; — 
I might be buried with the dead. 
Instead of laying melon rind 
Beneath the sod. 



Junior: 'Tve a dale tonight with that girl you introduced me to. I've this 
necklace for her birthday present." 

Senior: "She's doing well. Ask her to show you the bracelet I gave her last week 
for a birthday present." 

"Some guvs arc so dumb that thev think Ann Arbor is a flapper." 

"Well, isn't she?" 



Mr. Van Putten: "Yes. he's just about as important as an admiral of the Swiss 



navy. 



Frosh: "What is a joint account?" 

Soph: "It's one with which one person docs the depositing and another person the 
withdrawing." 

H. Wyatt: (In the heat of an argument) "Why, say. the land is so poor that 
jack rabbits pack lunches to cross the country." 

Tom: "Oh. for a five-day week. How about you. Bozzy?" 
Bozzy: I'm for a five-da) week-end." 



Toby T.: (In the heat of argument) "I know it's been that way ever since I 
can remember — at least fifty or sixty years." 



Van Putten: "Who's America's greatest general. Heath?" 
Heath: "General Motors." 



1929 






*ai 



Miss M.: "Why are these different kinds of leucocytes, when all of them perform 
the same function?" 

Student: "Variety is the spice of life." 



There is nothing noble to some other man. The true nobility is in being superior 
to your former self. 

Jack: "What became of those black shoes of yours?" 

Mike: "The patent leather ones?" 

Jack: "Ya." 

Mike: "The patent ran out." 



Prof: "In which of his battles was King Gustavus Adolphus killed?" 
Frosh: "It was his last, I think." 



Barber: "Wet or dry?" 

Kartak: "Cut mv hair; never mind politics." 



A man who cannot think, no matter how many facts he has stored in his memory, 
is not educated. 



Dodo: "What is the term applied to people who steal?" 
Reed: "Five or ten years, usually." 





f J? 









:v 



11929 






k « 



With Apologies to Vachel Lindsay 

Steel rails, straight ahead — 
On through the night! 
Shining in the moonbeams 
As far as sight can follow — 
On through the night! 
Ringing on the frosty air, 
Poundu 
Coughing, 
Surging. 

Sending echos rolling, 
Whistle shrieking 
Bell tolling, — 
On through the night! ! 
Passenger or butcher train. 
•it string and ore car. 
Engine, coach, and tender are 
Swaying, 
Ras: 
Mile on mile chasing, 

>X'ind and weather facing. 

Roaring. 

Snarling. 

Crushing, 

pushing. 
Beating, throbbing, 
Wailing, sobbing. 

Rushing, swaying, 

Mad and milling. 

Eaten by impelling wrath; 

Savage monarch of his path; 

On through the night. 



Page /« 




^Poo6workmg 



Originally a part of the great timber district and the teat of the operations of 
the famous Knapp, Stout, and Company, lumber manufacturers, Dunn County has 
gradually evolved into one of the richest farming areas in Northern Wisconsin. 



*9 



m 



The Menomonie Section 






EDITOR'S NOTE: 

This section of The Tower is paid for by Menomonie business men who believe in 
advertising which will benefit their city in general. The story and photographs which 
follow give the reader complete and worthwhile information regarding the city of 
Menomonie We are indeed glad to include this section in our book, and wish to thank 
the men who made it possible. The following business houses arc Tower boosters; give 
them your patronage. 



American Bakery Materials Company 

Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company 

S. K. Andreassen, D. V. S. 

Nels Anshus, Jeweler 

Badger State Lumber Company 

Bailey Insurance Agency 

Bank of Menomonie 

Bclair Studio, Photographer 

Booth by Print Shop 

Boston Drug Store 

I). A. Bowerman, D.D.S. 

S. Brace. D.D.S. 

Mrs. D. C. Brennan, Kitchen Shop 

A. !. Brummond, Tinsmith 
A. E. Bryant. D.V.S. 

v O. Livery. "Rent-a-Car" 
W. H. Carrington. Barber 
Carter Ice & Fuel Company 
Central House & Bus Station 
Chase & Wagner, Candy Shoppe 
City Fuel & Storage Com pan v 
C. F. Clark. D.D.S. 
F. A. Clark, Attorney 
( lear Oil Company 
Diamond Hat Shop 
Herbert Dixon, Wholesale Shoes 
Doorway Pastry Shop 
John Duesing. Insurance 
Dunn County Xews 
Eau Claire Press 
Ehrhard & Quilling, Druggists 
Evens-Tobin, Clothiers 
Excelsior Brick Company 
Farmers' Store Company, Gen'l Mdse. 
E. A. Feldt. Grocer 
First National Bank 
I. D. Fisher, Variety Store 
Flick Auto Company 
Fuller Auto Company 
C A. Fuller, D.D.S. 
Gamble Auto Supply Company 



Hansen Tire Shop 

M A. Hanson, Postmaster 

W . \V. Harrington, D.D.S. 

Haasc's Apparel Shop 

Dr. A. F. Heising 

A. E. Hcrrcm, Tailor 

Frank Hint/.man, Furniture 

J. T. Holstcin, Meat Market 

V. A. Hosford, Electric Shop 

Hotel Marion, Nick Jeatran, Prop. 

Ingraham Bros. & Torre y. Jewelers 

S. B. Ingram. Life Insurance 

A. J. Josephson, Dry Goods and 
Ready-to-Wcar 

Jungck Hardware Company 

Byron Kabot, Northwest Finance Co. 

Kraft State Bank 

Anna Krciser, Beauty Parlor 

Dr. C. T. Kyle, Osteopath 

Lakeview Barber Shop 
Lammcr's Grocery 

H. W. Laramy, Chiropractor 

I ee's Drug Store 
Dr. Win. Lumsden 
Ole Madsen, Jeweler 
M. A. Mattison 
J. A. McClcllan, Oil Station 
Menomonie Auto Company 
Menomonie Baking Companv 
Menomonie Clinic 
Menomonie Dairy Company 
Menomonie Dye House 
Menomonie-Eau Claire Nurseries. Inc. 
Menomonie Fuel & Supply Company 
Menomonie Gas Company 
Menomonie Greenhouse 
Menomonie Grocer Company 
Menomonie Hudson-Essex Sales 
Menomonie Insurance Agency 
Menomonie Oil Company 
Menomonie Shoe Shining Parlor 






I 



1929 



a«l 



MENOMONIE SECTION— CONTINI ED 



Golden Rule, Variety Store 

Goodrich Furniture Store 

Graven & Wilcox, Shoes 

Gregg's Music Store 

I tarry Halbcrg, Painting & Decorating 

Hamerly, P. H., Monument Dealer 

I. W . Nesser, Barber 

Nestle's Food Company 

Noer Drug Company 

Northern States Power Company 

A. R. Olson, Art Store 

Carl Olson, Undertaker 

Olympia Confectionery 

O. & N. Lumber Company 

One Minute Lunch 

Patterson Shop, 

Notions & Ready-to-We.ir 
Peerless Grill, "Home of Good Food" 
Carl E. Peterson. Mayor 
C. A. Pinkcpank, Grocer 
Randle's Service Station 

Red Owl Grocery 

Richardson & Richardson, Chiropractors 

Rudiger Radio Shop 

Schneider Brothers, City Meat Market 

August Schocnoff, Plumbing 

Shaker Studio, Photographer 



Menomonic Table Supply 
John Meyer, Tailor 
Micheels Clothes Shop 
Milady's Shoppc, Beauty Parlor 
Miller Smoke Shop 
C. J. Mower, Grocer 
J. E. Sleeper 
Smith Brothers, 

Orpheum & Grand Theatres 
Standard Oil Company 
Dm. Steves, Halgrcn & Long 
C. B. Stone. Life Insurance 
A. Summerrield, Men's & Ladies' Clothes 
Hans Swenby, Furniture 
S wen son & Berndt, Shoes 
Robert Taufman, Mgr. Express Office 
Teare Clothing Company 
O. A. Tillcson, Meats 
Vanity Beauty Parlor 
Volp's Grocery 
W'ehrlc Apparel Shop 
I lenry Will, Marion Barber Shop 
Williams Bros., Hdwe. & Machinery 
Wilson Land & Lumber Company 
Winona Oil Company 
Wisconsin Milling Company 




1929 



Pugf 157 




si n \ ion James H. Stout 
Pioneer Mcnomonie Business Man 

and 

Founder of The Scout Institute 

To Whose Memory 

This Section of The Tower Is Dedicated 



Page 15S 



**■ 







The Founder of Stout 

AN EDUCATIONAL PIONEER 

THE late Senator James H. Stout, lumberman, pioneer in education, and promi- 
nent citizen of Menomonie. was the founder of the famous school that car- 
rier his name. Mr. Stout was a man of far vision and philanthropic tendencies. 
He had an intense and generous interest in the welfare of humanity. He loved 
the boys and girls and they leved and admired him. It may be said that Irs later life 
w.is diligently devoted to the unfolding of an idea that had for its purpose the practical 
training of the mind and hand of the young people. 

The school had its beginning in 1890 in a small way and from that time until his 
death in 191(1 Mr. Stout's educational activities grew in interest and widened in scope 
with the development cf The Stout Institute. 

Mr. Stout's efforts in the service of education brought him to the front in a con- 
spicuous way in Wisconsin, and as the school grew his work came into national promi- 
nence. 

No sketch cf his life in b. can do justice to the man and his service to 

humanity. He gave unsparingly, unselfishly of h : s time, thought, and money to the 
upbuilding of the school that he had conceived for the "promotion of learning, skill, 
industry, and honor." 

Menomonie, heme of The Stout Institute, claims marked advantages from many 
viewpoints. Not only is it known throughout the country as a city of educational 
initiative, but it is commanding increasing attention for other excellent reasons. It 
is noted as a city of good homes, a city about which revolves the life of a rich, pro- 
gressive, and promising agricultural community: the center of almost unlimited water 
power, developed and undeveloped: a city which holds forth exceptional prospects to 
the manufacturer: favored with splendid transportation facilities, it invites the atten- 
tion of those interested in distribution; located on the banks of the Red Cedar River 



1929 






^ 




POWER DAM ON THE RED CEDAR RIVER 

and Lake Mcnomin and surrounded by a beautiful country in which abound streams that 
arc well stocked with fish, it is in the heart of a paradise for the disciples of 1/aak Wal- 
ton, while the fertile prairies and restful valleys within easy distance arc a lure alike 
to the home seeker and the tourist. 

Among the industries which support this thriving community, agriculture must 
be accorded first position. Originally a part of the great timber district and the seat of 
the operations of the famous Knapp. Stout and Company, lumber manufacturers, Dunn 
County has gradually evolved into enc of the richest farming areas in Northern Wis- 
consin. Dairying is the line of farming that is most favored and a tour through 
the districts contiguous to Menomonic invariably surprises the traveler by the character 
of the farm homes which it reveals. Wisconsin is known as the greatest dairy state- 
in the Union and Dunn County ranks among the highest of the seventy-one counties 
of the state in the output of butter. All of the cattle in Dunn County have been 
tested for tuberculosis by the State of Wisconsin. Milk that is produced by healthy cows 
lias a greater value and is safer for children. Hogs from counties that have had their 
cattle tested sell at a higher price on the market. 

While Menomonie is essentially in agricultural community as a center of a rich 
dairy section, dotted with flourishing creameries and cheese factories, it has a splendid 
representation along industrial lines. Prominent in the industries are three large- 
brickyards, tapping inexhaustible beds of finest clay. The flour industry likewise com- 
mands especial attention. Products of these industries go to all parts of the world. 
Oim: of the largest manufacturers of hardwood lumber in the state has its headquarters 
in Menomonie as does also one of the large chains of lumber yards. A piano factory, 
nurseries, and greenhouses, cigar factories, metal works, and dairy enterprises, including 
several large creameries, cheese factories, and a condensery contribute to a liberal pay- 
roll for Menomonic workmen. 

Menomonic's retail facilities provide an exceptional service. The city is a trade 
center for a large area, attracting shoppers for miles around by the complete, up-to-date, 
and high quality stocks of goods. Wholesale establishments are also well represented. 



929 






■s* 




li 1)1 RAI 111." I! DIM, 



Strong, growing banks form a vital part of the business life of Menomonie and 
provide complete financial facilities for the needs of the community. The deposits in 
these banks will aggregate about $7,000,000. 

The City of Menomonie is under the Commission Form of Government, govern- 
mental affairs being in the hands of a mayor and two councilmen. How well the 
people arc satisfied with this system was indicated in the fall of 1920, when by an 
overwhelming vote the electors decided not to return to the old aldermanic form. The 
city has several miles of well paved streets, a tine white way system in the business 
district, and many imposing public and private buildings which give the place a met- 
ropolitan aspect. Among the public buildings may be mentioned the commanding 
structures which form the home of The Stout Institute, a Federal Building, a Masonic 
Temple, County Court House, City Hall, and the Mabel Tainter Memorial, a beautiful 
stone edifice presented to the city about thirty years ago by the late Capt. Andrew 
Tainter, which contains a completely equipped theatre, public library, rooms for the 
G. A. R., and W. R. C, amusement room, and dining rooms available for public use. 

Menomonie has several fraternal organizations with large, active memberships. 
Among them is Hosford-Ch.isi Post No. 52, the American Legion, which in conjunction 
with its Auxiliary unit, maintains club rooms, where visiting Legionnaires are always 
welcome. 

Within the city are a number of musical groups, including the famous Ludington 
Guard Band, one of the best in the state, which has been in existence for many years. 
The summer concerts given on Tuesday evenings by this band from their shell in Wil- 
son Park draw thousands of people from the surrounding countrv. 

The city maintains a line public hospital at which the charges arc made as reason- 
able as possible. It owns several parks, in addition to which are a beautiful park- 
w.iv along the lake front, another along Wilson Creek Boulevard, and other pleasure 
grounds along the lake and streams, owned and controlled by the Menomonie Improve- 
ment Association. 









Page i6t 







THE MOTH MARION 



The Mcnomonic Country Club enjoys a splendid nine hole golf course of in- 
comparable beauty. Situated one mile from the city, on Federal Highways 10 and 12 

and State Highway 79. on the banks of Wilson Creek, the location is ideal. Par for 
the nine holes is 36. The Club House is provided with dressing and lounging rooms 
for the men and women, showers, a pro and caddy room, a well equipped kitchen, 1 
large dance and dining hall. The Country Club i\ available for use by visitors in 
Mcnomonic, and students of the summer school of The Stout Institute have the priv- 
ilege of its use through arrangements with the school authorities. 

The spiritual requirements of the community are provided for by several churches. 
The Congregational, Roman Catholic, two German I utheran. Episcopal, Methodist 
Episcopal, Baptist, Norwegian Lutheran, and Evangelical Association groups have sub- 
stantial church homes. Several have commodious parsonages. The pastors are men 
of ability and the auxiliary or organizations reach out into the community life in a way 
to greatly extend the church influence. 

A school nurse is regularly employed in connection with the public schools so 
that with the health and poor departments of the city government the needs of the 
people in these respects are well provided for. 

By its last census, Menomonie has a population of 5,104, but in appearance, enter- 
prise. ,xiu\ business activity it is ahead of most cities of its si/e. 

Its position as county seat of Dunn County makes it the official as well as the 
geographical and commercial center of the county. A circumstance which illustrates 
the importance of the city in relation to the surrounding country is the fact that ten 
rural free delivery routes emanate from the Mcnomonic postofficc, a number larger than 
that of any other county sjat in Wisconsin. 



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\!.\\o\k TEMPLE 



Representing; the commercial, industrial, civic, and social life of the community 
is the Mcnomonie Commercial Club, an active body of citizens whose endeavor is to 
make Mcnomonie a better city in the four lines indicated. The club is housed in the 
Masonic Temple, and its quarters .ire a convenient gathering place for many movements 
seeking the betterment of local conditions. The club is ever alert to welcome the new- 
comer and an interest in which it prides itself is that of Seeing that Mcnomonie is 
known as "the city of a square deal." 

Mcnomonie is c.isilv accessible to the motorist. The city is located on five Federal 
or State trunk highways. Federals 10 and 12 run diagonally across Wisconsin, forming 
a direct artery from Mcnomonie to southern Wisconsin and Chicago and a direct route 
to Manitowoc. Highways 25 and 79 run north and south and 29 cast and west, pro- 
viding a center for a network of important highways that make it convenient for the 
motorist to reach Mcnomonie. located about sixty-seven miles east of St. Paul, the 
city is reached by two important railway systems, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis 
& Omaha (comprising part of the Northwestern system) and the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railway. Motor busses operate frequently on Highways 10 and 12. 

The Hotel Marion offers resident guests and the traveling public modern accom- 
modations by virtue of the complete renovation of the Hotel Royal and the addition 
of a strictly fireproof annex. Fifty-two rooms comprise the capacity of the new hotel; 
all have running water, telephone, and other modern appointments, while a large num- 
ber are provided with private bath. Good accommodations arc also available at the 
Central House and other hotels. 













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mtmmm 




MABEL TAIN II R MI.MORIAI. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Emerson said, "Every great institution is the lengthening shadow of a great man." 
The truth of Emerson's statement is well illustrated here in Menomonie. Because of 
Senator Stout's position on the Board of Education of the Menomonie Public Schools, 
the shadow took shape and grew into the present Stout Institute. It was to the Public 
Schools that Senator Stout first turned his attention and it was in them that many of 
his progressive ideas were worked out. There is still reflected in the Public Schools 
much of the early progress which was developed when ideas new in educational thought 
were put into practice here. 

The schools arc organized along the lines suggested by the best modern practice 
into the senior high school, a junior high school, the intermediate and elementary grades, 
and kindergarten. The senior high school comprises the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades 
and has about 300 students. The junior high school comprises the 7th, 8th, and 9th 
grades and has about 250 students. 

The courses of study in the senior and junior high school are organized around the 
five major fields of educational interest, namely: English, Foreign Languages, Science, 
History, and Mathematics. In addition to these, vocational work, manual training. 
home economics, and commerce are also taught. Opportunity for work in music and 
the fine arts is also offered. The school maintains, at a high standard, a band, an or- 
chestra, and glee club for both boys and girls. A pupil with musical ability will find 
opportunity and encouragement to develop his talent. 






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UONIi (OUNTRY ( 1 I'B 






The junior high school program is arranged to give the pupil a large number of 
comparatively brief contacts with the field of education. In other words, it proposes 
to give the students a sample of each subject that the senior high school has to offer. 
>X'ith this experience the student can enter the senior high school, knowing in a way 
his likes .md dislikes, his special abilities, and with reasonable freedom of election se- 
lect these lines of work which suit his interest best. Especial mention should be made 
of the exceptional opportunity for work along lines of manual training and home 
economics which is open to the high school students. All the facilities of Stout are 
available for this work, giving it a range and equipment far beyond that found in the 
average public school. 

As proof of the quality of the high school work we point to the fact that the school 
is on the accredited list of the North Central Association of Colleges. This rating allows 
its graduates to enter without examination any college or university in the eighteen 
states comprising the Association. 

The health of the children is carefully guarded. A graduate nurse is a regular 
member of the teaching force. She visits each room practically every day. Contagious 
diseases are detected promptly and epidemics prevented. Defects of eves. ears, teeth, 
and throat arc discovered and recommendation for correction made to the parent. Un- 
der-nourished children are formed into nutrition classes which meet for dinner one 
day each week. In addition, under-nourished children are detected and with the ap- 
proval of the parents are given one feeding of milk each day at school. Correct foods 
are emphasized at the weekly luncheon. In Menomonie, parents can send their chil- 






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PUBI.K. IIOMMTAL 



drcn ta school with confidence that their health will not be jeopardized; rather, under 
the careful supervision, the child has a chance to grow up not only mentally but 

physically. 

On the whole Mcnomonic Public Schools are a decided credit to the city. They 
could be better schools; in fact, a virile public sentiment will make them better schools 
each year. The spirit of Senator Stout still lives in the hearts of Mcnomonic citizens. 
And always their public schools will spell to their boys and girls the one big American 
word, Opportunity. 

Mcnomonic also has several other schools, including the school of the St. Paul's 
Lutheran congregation and that of the St. Joseph's parish. The former represents a 
congregation consisting of some three hundred families; the latter has a school en- 
rollment varying between 110 and 125 pupils. 

The Dunn County School building is located in Menomonic. This houses the Rural 
Normal School and the county agricultural school. 

The Rural Normal School was one of the first to be opened in Wisconsin, having 
been started in September. 1899. Since September, 1924, it has had the Bowman Model 
School, which furnishes adequate opportunity for demonstration of methods and for 
practice teaching. 

The Dunn County School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy has several 
buildings adjacent to the main building. A four year course in Agriculture and a four 
year course in Domestic Economy are offered. Several other shorter courses are also 
available. Active extension work is carried out along many lines through the country. 



Page 166 



29 








DUNN COUNTY NORMAL SCHOOL 







11929 



Thank You 



IN closing the 1929 Tower, the Staff wishes to 
make grateful acknowledgment to those who 
have made the publication of this material pos- 
sible. To the advisers and to other instructors for 
their helpful counsel; to the student body for its 
generous response to all requests; to the advertis- 
ers for their live interest in the school and its year- 
book, the builders of this book express their sincere 
thanks. 







THE TOWER 



The engraving* in this book were made by the 

Be< >.Bi ! -\li ars Company, 

of Saint Paul, Minnesota. 

The book wai printed by the McGn i -W'ahni k COMPANY, 
of Saint Paul, Minnesota. 



PSti UB 



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